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Assessing the what is beautiful is good stereotype and the influence of moderately attractive and less attractive advertising models on self-perception, ad attitudes, and purchase intentions of 8–13-year-old children

Iris Vermeir (UGent) and Dieneke Van de Sompel (UGent)
(2014) JOURNAL OF CONSUMER POLICY. 37(2). p.205-233
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Abstract
This paper investigates (1) whether the physical attractiveness stereotype applies to children, (2) whether children’s self-perception is influenced by the attractiveness of an advertising model, (3) whether children’s attitudes towards an ad and buying intentions for a non-beauty-related product are influenced by the attractiveness of an advertising model, and (4) whether age affects (1), (2), and (3). Results of two experimental studies with respectively 8–9-year-old (N = 75) and 12–13 year old (N = 57) girls and boys confirm the presence of the physical attractiveness stereotype in children. The presence of a moderately attractive (vs. less attractive) model has a negative influence on general self-worth for 8–9-year-old boys, but not for girls, nor for 12–13-year-old children. Exposure to a moderately attractive (vs. less attractive) model also has a positive influence on perceived physical appearance of 8–9-year-old girls, but this effect does not occur for boys, nor for 12–13-year-olds. The studies also show that moderately attractive (vs. less attractive) models increase attitudes and buying intentions for 8–9-year-olds, but not for 12–13-year-old boys and girls.
Keywords
Physical attractiveness stereotype, Self-perception, Children, Physical attractiveness, Advertising effectiveness

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MLA
Vermeir, Iris, and Dieneke Van de Sompel. “Assessing the What Is Beautiful Is Good Stereotype and the Influence of Moderately Attractive and Less Attractive Advertising Models on Self-Perception, Ad Attitudes, and Purchase Intentions of 8–13-Year-Old Children.” JOURNAL OF CONSUMER POLICY, vol. 37, no. 2, Springer US, 2014, pp. 205–33, doi:10.1007/s10603-013-9245-x.
APA
Vermeir, I., & Van de Sompel, D. (2014). Assessing the what is beautiful is good stereotype and the influence of moderately attractive and less attractive advertising models on self-perception, ad attitudes, and purchase intentions of 8–13-year-old children. JOURNAL OF CONSUMER POLICY, 37(2), 205–233. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10603-013-9245-x
Chicago author-date
Vermeir, Iris, and Dieneke Van de Sompel. 2014. “Assessing the What Is Beautiful Is Good Stereotype and the Influence of Moderately Attractive and Less Attractive Advertising Models on Self-Perception, Ad Attitudes, and Purchase Intentions of 8–13-Year-Old Children.” JOURNAL OF CONSUMER POLICY 37 (2): 205–33. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10603-013-9245-x.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Vermeir, Iris, and Dieneke Van de Sompel. 2014. “Assessing the What Is Beautiful Is Good Stereotype and the Influence of Moderately Attractive and Less Attractive Advertising Models on Self-Perception, Ad Attitudes, and Purchase Intentions of 8–13-Year-Old Children.” JOURNAL OF CONSUMER POLICY 37 (2): 205–233. doi:10.1007/s10603-013-9245-x.
Vancouver
1.
Vermeir I, Van de Sompel D. Assessing the what is beautiful is good stereotype and the influence of moderately attractive and less attractive advertising models on self-perception, ad attitudes, and purchase intentions of 8–13-year-old children. JOURNAL OF CONSUMER POLICY. 2014;37(2):205–33.
IEEE
[1]
I. Vermeir and D. Van de Sompel, “Assessing the what is beautiful is good stereotype and the influence of moderately attractive and less attractive advertising models on self-perception, ad attitudes, and purchase intentions of 8–13-year-old children,” JOURNAL OF CONSUMER POLICY, vol. 37, no. 2, pp. 205–233, 2014.
@article{4238782,
  abstract     = {{This paper investigates (1) whether the physical attractiveness stereotype applies to children, (2) whether children’s self-perception is influenced by the attractiveness of an advertising model, (3) whether children’s attitudes towards an ad and buying intentions for a non-beauty-related product are influenced by the attractiveness of an advertising model, and (4) whether age affects (1), (2), and (3). Results of two experimental studies with respectively 8–9-year-old (N = 75) and 12–13 year old (N = 57) girls and boys confirm the presence of the physical attractiveness stereotype in children. The presence of a moderately attractive (vs. less attractive) model has a negative influence on general self-worth for 8–9-year-old boys, but not for girls, nor for 12–13-year-old children. Exposure to a moderately attractive (vs. less attractive) model also has a positive influence on perceived physical appearance of 8–9-year-old girls, but this effect does not occur for boys, nor for 12–13-year-olds. The studies also show that moderately attractive (vs. less attractive) models increase attitudes and buying intentions for 8–9-year-olds, but not for 12–13-year-old boys and girls.}},
  author       = {{Vermeir, Iris and Van de Sompel, Dieneke}},
  issn         = {{0168-7034}},
  journal      = {{JOURNAL OF CONSUMER POLICY}},
  keywords     = {{Physical attractiveness stereotype,Self-perception,Children,Physical attractiveness,Advertising effectiveness}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{2}},
  pages        = {{205--233}},
  publisher    = {{Springer US}},
  title        = {{Assessing the what is beautiful is good stereotype and the influence of moderately attractive and less attractive advertising models on self-perception, ad attitudes, and purchase intentions of 8–13-year-old children}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10603-013-9245-x}},
  volume       = {{37}},
  year         = {{2014}},
}

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