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Does gastrointestinal digestion affect low level thiouracil residues upon Brassicaceae derived food and feed consumption?

Julie Kiebooms (UGent) , Julie Vanden Bussche (UGent) , Hubert De Brabander (UGent) and Lynn Vanhaecke (UGent)
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Abstract
In recent years, endogenous formation of thiouracil (TU) has been reported in the urine of livestock upon consumption of glucosinolate-rich crops, belonging to the Brassicaceae (Pinel et al., 2006). This has been a staggering discovery, since the European Union in 1981 banned the use of thyreostatic drugs for fattening purposes in livestock. Previously, TU has been demonstrated in various Brassicaceae-derived foods and feeds (<1.0 µg kg-1 - 5.98 µg kg-1) upon myrosinase addition (Vanden Bussche et al., 2011). The impact of bacterial myrosinase produced during digestion has however not been evaluated before in relation to TU production in livestock. Therefore, during this study in vitro bovine and porcine digestive simulations of various Brassicaceae-derived foods and feeds were performed. Derivatization and LC-MS2 analysis of the digestive samples resulted in the detection of TU in the large intestine and the rumen for various Brassicaceae matrices. In stomach and small intestinal digestive fluids, however, TU remained unfound. The influence of autoclavation on the inoculum and the feed was compared to a control, resulting in a significantly minor TU yield for the autoclaved inoculum (p<0.05). In conclusion, these results confirm the active involvement of intestinal microbiota in TU formation during gastro-intestinal digestion of Brassicaceae-derived feed, thus demonstrating plant-myrosinase is not the only possible mediator.

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Chicago
Kiebooms, Julie, Julie Vanden Bussche, Hubert De Brabander, and Lynn Vanhaecke. 2012. “Does Gastrointestinal Digestion Affect Low Level Thiouracil Residues Upon Brassicaceae Derived Food and Feed Consumption?” In Residues of Veterinary Drugs in Food : Proceedings of the EuroResidue VII Conference, ed. Robert Schilt, 143–148. Wageningen, The Netherlands: RIKILT.
APA
Kiebooms, J., Vanden Bussche, J., De Brabander, H., & Vanhaecke, L. (2012). Does gastrointestinal digestion affect low level thiouracil residues upon Brassicaceae derived food and feed consumption? In Robert Schilt (Ed.), Residues of veterinary drugs in food : proceedings of the EuroResidue VII conference (pp. 143–148). Presented at the EuroResidue VII, Wageningen, The Netherlands: RIKILT.
Vancouver
1.
Kiebooms J, Vanden Bussche J, De Brabander H, Vanhaecke L. Does gastrointestinal digestion affect low level thiouracil residues upon Brassicaceae derived food and feed consumption? In: Schilt R, editor. Residues of veterinary drugs in food : proceedings of the EuroResidue VII conference. Wageningen, The Netherlands: RIKILT; 2012. p. 143–8.
MLA
Kiebooms, Julie, Julie Vanden Bussche, Hubert De Brabander, et al. “Does Gastrointestinal Digestion Affect Low Level Thiouracil Residues Upon Brassicaceae Derived Food and Feed Consumption?” Residues of Veterinary Drugs in Food : Proceedings of the EuroResidue VII Conference. Ed. Robert Schilt. Wageningen, The Netherlands: RIKILT, 2012. 143–148. Print.
@inproceedings{4235225,
  abstract     = {In recent years, endogenous formation of thiouracil (TU) has been reported in the urine of livestock upon consumption of glucosinolate-rich crops, belonging to the Brassicaceae (Pinel et al., 2006). This has been a staggering discovery, since the European Union in 1981 banned the use of thyreostatic drugs for fattening purposes in livestock. 
Previously, TU has been demonstrated in various Brassicaceae-derived foods and feeds ({\textlangle}1.0 {\textmu}g kg-1 - 5.98 {\textmu}g kg-1) upon myrosinase addition (Vanden Bussche et al., 2011). The impact of bacterial myrosinase produced during digestion has however not been evaluated before in relation to TU production in livestock.
Therefore, during this study in vitro bovine and porcine digestive simulations of various Brassicaceae-derived foods and feeds were performed. Derivatization and LC-MS2 analysis of the digestive samples resulted in the detection of TU in the large intestine and the rumen for various Brassicaceae matrices. In stomach and small intestinal digestive fluids, however, TU remained unfound. The influence of autoclavation on the inoculum and the feed was compared to a control, resulting in a significantly minor TU yield for the autoclaved inoculum (p{\textlangle}0.05).
In conclusion, these results confirm the active involvement of intestinal microbiota in TU formation during gastro-intestinal digestion of Brassicaceae-derived feed, thus demonstrating plant-myrosinase is not the only possible mediator.},
  articleno    = {paper O2},
  author       = {Kiebooms, Julie and Vanden Bussche, Julie and De Brabander, Hubert and Vanhaecke, Lynn},
  booktitle    = {Residues of veterinary drugs in food : proceedings of the EuroResidue VII conference},
  editor       = {Schilt, Robert},
  isbn         = {9789461733184},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Egmond aan Zee, The Netherlands},
  pages        = {paper O2:143--paper O2:148},
  publisher    = {RIKILT},
  title        = {Does gastrointestinal digestion affect low level thiouracil residues upon Brassicaceae derived food and feed consumption?},
  year         = {2012},
}