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Does scapular positioning predict shoulder pain in recreational overhead athletes?

Filip Struyf, Jo Nijs, Mira Meeus UGent, Nathalie A Roussel, Sarah Mottram, Steven Truijen and Romain Meeusen (2014) INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE. 35(1). p.75-82
abstract
The objective of this prospective study is to investigate possible scapular related risk factors for developing shoulder pain. Therefore, a 2-year follow-up study in a general community sports centre setting was conducted. A sample of convenience of 113 recreational overhead athletes (59 women and 54 men) with a mean age of 34 (17-64; SD 12) years were recruited. At baseline, visual observation for scapular dyskinesis, measured scapular protraction, upward scapular rotation and dynamic scapular control were evaluated. 22% (n=25) of all athletes developed shoulder pain during the 24 months following baseline assessment. The Mean Shoulder Disability Questionnaire (SDQ) score for the painful shoulders was 34.8 (6.3-62.5; SD 17.4). None of the scapular characteristics predicted the development of shoulder pain. However, the athletes that developed shoulder pain demonstrated significantly less upward scapular rotation at 45 degrees (p=0.010) and 90 degrees (p=0.016) of shoulder abduction in the frontal plane at baseline in comparison to the athletes that remained pain-free. In conclusion, although these scapular characteristics are not of predictive value for the development of shoulder pain, this study increases our understanding of the importance of a scapular upward rotation assessment among recreational overhead athletes.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (review)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
scapula, shoulder, pain, clinical, IMPINGEMENT SYNDROME, CLINICAL-ASSESSMENT, DISABILITY QUESTIONNAIRE, KINEMATICS, MOTION, ORIENTATION, RELIABILITY, INSTABILITY, DYSKINESIS, ROTATION
journal title
INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE
Int. J. Sports Med.
volume
35
issue
1
pages
75 - 82
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000329430000012
JCR category
SPORT SCIENCES
JCR impact factor
2.065 (2014)
JCR rank
24/81 (2014)
JCR quartile
2 (2014)
ISSN
0172-4622
DOI
10.1055/s-0033-1343409
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
4235124
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-4235124
date created
2014-01-17 10:38:42
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:38:13
@article{4235124,
  abstract     = {The objective of this prospective study is to investigate possible scapular related risk factors for developing shoulder pain. Therefore, a 2-year follow-up study in a general community sports centre setting was conducted. A sample of convenience of 113 recreational overhead athletes (59 women and 54 men) with a mean age of 34 (17-64; SD 12) years were recruited. At baseline, visual observation for scapular dyskinesis, measured scapular protraction, upward scapular rotation and dynamic scapular control were evaluated. 22\% (n=25) of all athletes developed shoulder pain during the 24 months following baseline assessment. The Mean Shoulder Disability Questionnaire (SDQ) score for the painful shoulders was 34.8 (6.3-62.5; SD 17.4). None of the scapular characteristics predicted the development of shoulder pain. However, the athletes that developed shoulder pain demonstrated significantly less upward scapular rotation at 45 degrees (p=0.010) and 90 degrees (p=0.016) of shoulder abduction in the frontal plane at baseline in comparison to the athletes that remained pain-free. In conclusion, although these scapular characteristics are not of predictive value for the development of shoulder pain, this study increases our understanding of the importance of a scapular upward rotation assessment among recreational overhead athletes.},
  author       = {Struyf, Filip and Nijs, Jo and Meeus, Mira and Roussel, Nathalie A and Mottram, Sarah and Truijen, Steven and Meeusen, Romain},
  issn         = {0172-4622},
  journal      = {INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE},
  keyword      = {scapula,shoulder,pain,clinical,IMPINGEMENT SYNDROME,CLINICAL-ASSESSMENT,DISABILITY QUESTIONNAIRE,KINEMATICS,MOTION,ORIENTATION,RELIABILITY,INSTABILITY,DYSKINESIS,ROTATION},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {75--82},
  title        = {Does scapular positioning predict shoulder pain in recreational overhead athletes?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0033-1343409},
  volume       = {35},
  year         = {2014},
}

Chicago
Struyf, Filip, Jo Nijs, Mira Meeus, Nathalie A Roussel, Sarah Mottram, Steven Truijen, and Romain Meeusen. 2014. “Does Scapular Positioning Predict Shoulder Pain in Recreational Overhead Athletes?” International Journal of Sports Medicine 35 (1): 75–82.
APA
Struyf, F., Nijs, J., Meeus, M., Roussel, N. A., Mottram, S., Truijen, S., & Meeusen, R. (2014). Does scapular positioning predict shoulder pain in recreational overhead athletes? INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE, 35(1), 75–82.
Vancouver
1.
Struyf F, Nijs J, Meeus M, Roussel NA, Mottram S, Truijen S, et al. Does scapular positioning predict shoulder pain in recreational overhead athletes? INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE. 2014;35(1):75–82.
MLA
Struyf, Filip, Jo Nijs, Mira Meeus, et al. “Does Scapular Positioning Predict Shoulder Pain in Recreational Overhead Athletes?” INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE 35.1 (2014): 75–82. Print.