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Obesity and association with area of residence, gender and socio-economic factors in Algerian and Tunisian adults

Madjid Atek, Pierre Traissac, Jalila El Ati, Youcef Laid, Hajer Aounallah-Skhiri, Sabrina Eymard-Duvernay, Nadia Mézimèche, Souha Bougatef, Chiraz Béji, Leila Boutekdjiret, et al. (2013) PLOS ONE. 8(10).
abstract
Introduction: The epidemiological transition has resulted in a major increase in the prevalence of obesity in North Africa. This study investigated differences in obesity and its association with area of residence, gender and socio-economic position among adults in Algeria and Tunisia, two countries with socio-economic and socio-cultural similarities. Methods: Cross-sectional studies used stratified, three-level, clustered samples of 35-70 year old adults in Algeria, (women n = 2741, men n = 2004) and Tunisia (women n = 2964, men n = 2379). Thinness was defined as Body Mass Index (BMI) = weight/height,< 18.5 kg/m(2), obesity as BMI >= 30, and abdominal obesity as waist circumference/height >= 0.6. Associations with area of residence, gender, age, education, profession and household welfare were assessed. Results: Prevalence of thinness was very low except among men in Algeria (7.3% C.I.[5.9-8.7]). Prevalence of obesity among women was high in Algeria (30.1% C.I.[27.8-32.4]) and Tunisia (37.0% C.I.[34.4-39.6]). It was less so among men (9.1% C.I.[7.1-11.0] and 13.3% C.I.[11.2-15.4]). The results were similar for abdominal obesity. In both countries women were much more obesity-prone than men: the women versus men obesity Odds-Ratio was 4.3 C.I.[3.4-5.5] in Algeria and 3.8 C.I.[3.1-4.7] in Tunisia. Obesity was more prevalent in urban versus rural areas in Tunisia, but not in Algeria (e. g. for women, urban versus rural Odds-Ratio was 2.4 C.I.[1.9-3.1] in Tunisia and only 1.2 C.I.[1.0-5.5] in Algeria). Obesity increased with household welfare, but more markedly in Tunisia, especially among women. Nevertheless, in both countries, even in the lowest quintile of welfare, a fifth of the women were obese. Conclusion: The prevention of obesity, especially in women, is a public health issue in both countries, but there were differences in the patterning of obesity according to area of residence and socio-economic position. These specificities must be taken into account in the management of obesity inequalities.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
Tunisia, women, Thinness, specificity, socioeconomic factors, sample, rural, public health, prevention, prevalence, Odds Ratio, obesity, methods, Men, inequalities, health, gender, education, countries, body mass index, BMI, Africa, Adult, adults, POSITION, OVERWEIGHT, PREVALENCE, UNDERWEIGHT, WOMEN, RISK-FACTORS, URBAN-ENVIRONMENT, MIDDLE-INCOME COUNTRIES, NUTRITION TRANSITION, urban
journal title
PLOS ONE
PLoS One
volume
8
issue
10
article number
e75640
pages
10 pages
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000325552200032
JCR category
MULTIDISCIPLINARY SCIENCES
JCR impact factor
3.534 (2013)
JCR rank
8/55 (2013)
JCR quartile
1 (2013)
ISSN
1932-6203
DOI
10.1371/journal.pone.0075640
language
English
UGent publication?
no
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have retained and own the full copyright for this publication
id
4212646
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-4212646
date created
2013-12-19 10:45:08
date last changed
2018-03-29 09:44:43
@article{4212646,
  abstract     = {Introduction: The epidemiological transition has resulted in a major increase in the prevalence of obesity in North Africa. This study investigated differences in obesity and its association with area of residence, gender and socio-economic position among adults in Algeria and Tunisia, two countries with socio-economic and socio-cultural similarities.
Methods: Cross-sectional studies used stratified, three-level, clustered samples of 35-70 year old adults in Algeria, (women n = 2741, men n = 2004) and Tunisia (women n = 2964, men n = 2379). Thinness was defined as Body Mass Index (BMI) = weight/height,{\textlangle} 18.5 kg/m(2), obesity as BMI {\textrangle}= 30, and abdominal obesity as waist circumference/height {\textrangle}= 0.6. Associations with area of residence, gender, age, education, profession and household welfare were assessed.
Results: Prevalence of thinness was very low except among men in Algeria (7.3\% C.I.[5.9-8.7]). Prevalence of obesity among women was high in Algeria (30.1\% C.I.[27.8-32.4]) and Tunisia (37.0\% C.I.[34.4-39.6]). It was less so among men (9.1\% C.I.[7.1-11.0] and 13.3\% C.I.[11.2-15.4]). The results were similar for abdominal obesity. In both countries women were much more obesity-prone than men: the women versus men obesity Odds-Ratio was 4.3 C.I.[3.4-5.5] in Algeria and 3.8 C.I.[3.1-4.7] in Tunisia. Obesity was more prevalent in urban versus rural areas in Tunisia, but not in Algeria (e. g. for women, urban versus rural Odds-Ratio was 2.4 C.I.[1.9-3.1] in Tunisia and only 1.2 C.I.[1.0-5.5] in Algeria). Obesity increased with household welfare, but more markedly in Tunisia, especially among women. Nevertheless, in both countries, even in the lowest quintile of welfare, a fifth of the women were obese.
Conclusion: The prevention of obesity, especially in women, is a public health issue in both countries, but there were differences in the patterning of obesity according to area of residence and socio-economic position. These specificities must be taken into account in the management of obesity inequalities.},
  articleno    = {e75640},
  author       = {Atek, Madjid and Traissac, Pierre and El Ati, Jalila and Laid, Youcef and Aounallah-Skhiri, Hajer and Eymard-Duvernay, Sabrina and M{\'e}zim{\`e}che, Nadia and Bougatef, Souha and B{\'e}ji, Chiraz and Boutekdjiret, Leila and Martin-Pr{\'e}vel, Yves and Lebcir, Hassiba and Gartner, Agn{\`e}s and Kolsteren, Patrick and Delpeuch, Francis and Ben Romdhane, Habiba and Maire, Bernard},
  issn         = {1932-6203},
  journal      = {PLOS ONE},
  keyword      = {Tunisia,women,Thinness,specificity,socioeconomic factors,sample,rural,public health,prevention,prevalence,Odds Ratio,obesity,methods,Men,inequalities,health,gender,education,countries,body mass index,BMI,Africa,Adult,adults,POSITION,OVERWEIGHT,PREVALENCE,UNDERWEIGHT,WOMEN,RISK-FACTORS,URBAN-ENVIRONMENT,MIDDLE-INCOME COUNTRIES,NUTRITION TRANSITION,urban},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {10},
  title        = {Obesity and association with area of residence, gender and socio-economic factors in Algerian and Tunisian adults},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0075640},
  volume       = {8},
  year         = {2013},
}

Chicago
Atek, Madjid, Pierre Traissac, Jalila El Ati, Youcef Laid, Hajer Aounallah-Skhiri, Sabrina Eymard-Duvernay, Nadia Mézimèche, et al. 2013. “Obesity and Association with Area of Residence, Gender and Socio-economic Factors in Algerian and Tunisian Adults.” Plos One 8 (10).
APA
Atek, M., Traissac, P., El Ati, J., Laid, Y., Aounallah-Skhiri, H., Eymard-Duvernay, S., Mézimèche, N., et al. (2013). Obesity and association with area of residence, gender and socio-economic factors in Algerian and Tunisian adults. PLOS ONE, 8(10).
Vancouver
1.
Atek M, Traissac P, El Ati J, Laid Y, Aounallah-Skhiri H, Eymard-Duvernay S, et al. Obesity and association with area of residence, gender and socio-economic factors in Algerian and Tunisian adults. PLOS ONE. 2013;8(10).
MLA
Atek, Madjid, Pierre Traissac, Jalila El Ati, et al. “Obesity and Association with Area of Residence, Gender and Socio-economic Factors in Algerian and Tunisian Adults.” PLOS ONE 8.10 (2013): n. pag. Print.