Advanced search

Atmospheric methane removal by methane-oxidizing bacteria immobilized on porous building materilas

Giovanni Ganendra (UGent) , Willem De Muynck (UGent) , Adrian Ho (UGent) , Sven Hoefman (UGent) , Paul De Vos (UGent) , Pascal Boeckx (UGent) , Willy Verstraete (UGent) and Nico Boon (UGent)
Author
Organization
Abstract
Among various methane emission mitigation strategies, biological treatment that relies on the action of methanotrophic bacteria immobilized on carrier materials is considered as one of the best solutions because of its economic benefit. The specific surface area and porosity of the support are the most important factors in efficient biological removal of methane. In places with high methane emission such as cities and animal houses, building materials having a high porosity and surface area may provide a niche for methanotrophic bacteria. In this study, we evaluated the methane removal efficiency of methanotrophic bacteria immobilized on building materials. Six different types of building material were chosen for the experiment based on their porosity and specific surface area properties. Experiments were performed with different methanotrophic bacteria inoculated in building materials at high (~20 (v/v)) and low (50 ppmv) methane concentration. Among different materials tested, bacteria inoculated in Maastricht limestone and Ytong (both materials having a porosity higher than 40% (v/v)), showed higher methane removal compared to bacteria immobilized in low porosity materials. Between the two materials, Maastricht limestone appeared to be the best support with 99.9% methane removal by M. alcaliphilum DSM 19304T (high concentration) and 64% removal by M. parvus NCIMB 11129T (low concentration). This could be attributed to the the high % (v/v) of macropores (i.e., pores > 5 µm) of Maastricht limestone although Ytong possessed higher surface area. Higher efficiency at low concentration (99.5% methane removal) was obtained when Maastricht limestone was inoculated with 8.108 cells/ml of M. parvus culture. From this study it was shown that methane can be efficiently removed from the atmosphere by methanotrophic bacteria immobilized on building materials. Among the properties of the building material, the amount of macropores had a more profound impact on the methane removal compared to the specific surface area.
Keywords
methanotrophic bacteria, biological methane mitigation, building materials

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Ganendra, Giovanni, Willem De Muynck, Adrian Ho, Sven Hoefman, Paul De Vos, Pascal Boeckx, Willy Verstraete, and Nico Boon. 2013. “Atmospheric Methane Removal by Methane-oxidizing Bacteria Immobilized on Porous Building Materilas.” In Self-Healing Materials, 4th International Conference, Abstracts, ed. Nele De Belie, Sybrand van der Zwaag, Elke Gruyaert, Kim Van Tittelboom, and Brenda Debbaut, 64–64. Ghent, Belgium: Ghent University. Magnel Laboratory for Concrete Research.
APA
Ganendra, G., De Muynck, W., Ho, A., Hoefman, S., De Vos, P., Boeckx, P., Verstraete, W., et al. (2013). Atmospheric methane removal by methane-oxidizing bacteria immobilized on porous building materilas. In Nele De Belie, S. van der Zwaag, E. Gruyaert, K. Van Tittelboom, & B. Debbaut (Eds.), Self-Healing Materials, 4th International conference, Abstracts (pp. 64–64). Presented at the 4th International conference on Self-Healing Materials (ICSHM 2013), Ghent, Belgium: Ghent University. Magnel Laboratory for Concrete Research.
Vancouver
1.
Ganendra G, De Muynck W, Ho A, Hoefman S, De Vos P, Boeckx P, et al. Atmospheric methane removal by methane-oxidizing bacteria immobilized on porous building materilas. In: De Belie N, van der Zwaag S, Gruyaert E, Van Tittelboom K, Debbaut B, editors. Self-Healing Materials, 4th International conference, Abstracts. Ghent, Belgium: Ghent University. Magnel Laboratory for Concrete Research; 2013. p. 64–64.
MLA
Ganendra, Giovanni, Willem De Muynck, Adrian Ho, et al. “Atmospheric Methane Removal by Methane-oxidizing Bacteria Immobilized on Porous Building Materilas.” Self-Healing Materials, 4th International Conference, Abstracts. Ed. Nele De Belie et al. Ghent, Belgium: Ghent University. Magnel Laboratory for Concrete Research, 2013. 64–64. Print.
@inproceedings{4211353,
  abstract     = {Among various methane emission mitigation strategies, biological treatment that relies on the action of methanotrophic bacteria immobilized on carrier materials is considered as one of the best solutions because of its economic benefit. The specific surface area and porosity of the support are the most important factors in efficient biological removal of methane. In places with high methane emission such as cities and animal houses, building materials having a high porosity and surface area may provide a niche for methanotrophic bacteria. In this study, we evaluated the methane removal efficiency of methanotrophic bacteria immobilized on building materials. 
Six different types of building material were chosen for the experiment based on their porosity and specific surface area properties. Experiments were performed with different methanotrophic bacteria inoculated in building materials at high ({\texttildelow}20 (v/v)) and low (50 ppmv) methane concentration. 
Among different materials tested, bacteria inoculated in Maastricht limestone and Ytong (both materials having a porosity higher than 40\% (v/v)), showed higher methane removal compared to bacteria immobilized in low porosity materials. Between the two materials, Maastricht limestone appeared to be the best support with 99.9\% methane removal by M. alcaliphilum DSM 19304T (high concentration) and 64\% removal by M. parvus NCIMB 11129T (low concentration). This could be attributed to the the high \% (v/v) of macropores (i.e., pores {\textrangle} 5 {\textmu}m) of Maastricht limestone although Ytong possessed higher surface area. Higher efficiency at low concentration (99.5\% methane removal) was obtained when Maastricht limestone was inoculated with 8.108 cells/ml of M. parvus culture. 
From this study it was shown that methane can be efficiently removed from the atmosphere by methanotrophic bacteria immobilized on building materials. Among the properties of the building material, the amount of macropores had a more profound impact on the methane removal compared to the specific surface area.},
  author       = {Ganendra, Giovanni and De Muynck, Willem and Ho, Adrian and Hoefman, Sven and De Vos, Paul and Boeckx, Pascal and Verstraete, Willy and Boon, Nico},
  booktitle    = {Self-Healing Materials, 4th International conference, Abstracts},
  editor       = {De Belie, Nele and van der Zwaag, Sybrand  and Gruyaert, Elke and Van Tittelboom, Kim and Debbaut, Brenda},
  isbn         = {9789082073706},
  keyword      = {methanotrophic bacteria,biological methane mitigation,building materials},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Ghent, Belgium},
  pages        = {64--64},
  publisher    = {Ghent University. Magnel Laboratory for Concrete Research},
  title        = {Atmospheric methane removal by methane-oxidizing bacteria immobilized on porous building materilas},
  year         = {2013},
}