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Projection systems for vehicle displays

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Abstract
Direct view displays are nowadays common in vehicle displays of various nature to convey information. They are mostly LCD-based and benefit from the maturity and reliability of this well-developed technology. However, they also have some drawbacks that prevent them from being completely adapted to the wishes of human-machine interface designers. Prominent aspects in this respect are the more or less fixed form-factor, the limited curveability and the problematic tiling of several displays with visible seams. These points make it difficult to use these displays on complex, arbitrary shaped surfaces as encountered in many vehicle environments and are thus an obstacle to create high-information content screens in novel human-machine interfaces in the confined spaces of vehicles. Projection technology is a suitable candidate to solve many of these problems. Front projection techniques, e.g. head-up displays on the front-window of cars are coming into use1; the specialized versions of these in (fighter-) planes are already common for quite some years. These approaches however do not fully address the demands of the HMI developers for creating more complex interfaces. Recent developments open up the possibility to use the potential of the projection technology to the full. Rear-projection systems that allow the creation of free-form displays in cars are currently being investigated. For airplane environments, which provide an even greater challenge due to the safety regulations, a rear projection based, reconfigurable single large cockpit display was developed4. It allows the use of a new paradigm in human-machine interface, featuring a cockpit-wide curved screen surface with touch capabilities. It uses LCOS microdisplays, a high performance LED illumination system, custom short throw projection lenses and accompanying screen. The whole system comprises of five seamlessly tiled projectors providing a non-flat, T-shaped dashboard. The screen is equipped with a multi-touch capable interface based on optical detection, making it possible to place both information and instruments at any position, depending on the situation.
Keywords
projection, cockpit, LCOS

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Cuypers, Dieter, Herbert De Smet, Ann Monté, Xavier Hugel, and Guilhem Dubroca. 2013. “Projection Systems for Vehicle Displays.” In 13th International Meeting on Information Display, Abstracts, 6–6.
APA
Cuypers, D., De Smet, H., Monté, A., Hugel, X., & Dubroca, G. (2013). Projection systems for vehicle displays. 13th International Meeting on Information Display, Abstracts (pp. 6–6). Presented at the 13th International Meeting on Information Display.
Vancouver
1.
Cuypers D, De Smet H, Monté A, Hugel X, Dubroca G. Projection systems for vehicle displays. 13th International Meeting on Information Display, Abstracts. 2013. p. 6–6.
MLA
Cuypers, Dieter, Herbert De Smet, Ann Monté, et al. “Projection Systems for Vehicle Displays.” 13th International Meeting on Information Display, Abstracts. 2013. 6–6. Print.
@inproceedings{4211273,
  abstract     = {Direct view displays are nowadays common in vehicle displays of various nature to convey information. They are mostly LCD-based and benefit from the maturity and reliability of this well-developed technology. However, they also have some drawbacks that prevent them from being completely adapted to the wishes of human-machine interface designers. Prominent aspects in this respect are the more or less fixed form-factor, the limited curveability and the problematic tiling of several displays with visible seams. These points make it difficult to use these displays on complex, arbitrary shaped surfaces as encountered in many vehicle environments and are thus an obstacle to create high-information content screens in novel human-machine interfaces in the confined spaces of vehicles. Projection technology is a suitable candidate to solve many of these problems. Front projection techniques, e.g. head-up displays on the front-window of cars are coming into use1; the specialized versions of these in (fighter-) planes are already common for quite some years.
These approaches however do not fully address the demands of the HMI developers for creating more complex interfaces. Recent developments open up the possibility to use the potential of the projection technology to the full. Rear-projection systems that allow the creation of free-form displays in cars are currently being investigated. For airplane environments, which provide an even greater challenge due to the safety regulations, a rear projection based, reconfigurable single large cockpit display was developed4. It allows the use of a new paradigm in human-machine interface, featuring a cockpit-wide curved screen surface with touch capabilities. It uses LCOS microdisplays, a high performance LED illumination system, custom short throw projection lenses and accompanying screen. The whole system comprises of five seamlessly tiled projectors providing a non-flat, T-shaped dashboard. The screen is equipped with a multi-touch capable interface based on optical detection, making it possible to place both information and instruments at any position, depending on the situation.},
  author       = {Cuypers, Dieter and De Smet, Herbert and Mont{\'e}, Ann and Hugel, Xavier and Dubroca, Guilhem},
  booktitle    = {13th International Meeting on Information Display, Abstracts},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Daegu, Korea},
  pages        = {6--6},
  title        = {Projection systems for vehicle displays},
  year         = {2013},
}