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Manipulating nitrogen release from nitrogen-rich crop residues using organic wastes under field conditions

Barbara Chaves, Stefaan De Neve UGent, Pascal Boeckx UGent, Oswald Van Cleemput UGent and Georges Hofman UGent (2007) SOIL SCIENCE SOCIETY OF AMERICA JOURNAL. 71(4). p.1240-1250
abstract
Following mineralization of N-rich crop residues, large amounts of mineral N can be released into the soil. Manipulating N mineralization of crop residues may be an option to reduce NO3- in soil. The potential to manipulate the N release from vegetable crop residues by using organic wastes was tested under field conditions. At the start of the experiment, cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L. var. botrytis L.) residues (similar to 73 Mg fresh matter ha(-1)) together with an immobilizer waste (similar to 5 Mg C ha(-1) of straw, green waste compost, sawdust, or paper sludge) were incorporated into a silt loam soil. After 154 d, a remineralizing waste (similar to 1 Mg C ha 1 of vinasse or dairy sludge) was incorporated. During the field experiment, the mineral N content in the soil was measured at regular time intervals, and net N release, NO3- leaching, and denitrification were simulated using a N mineralization-immobilization model coupled to a NO3- leaching model. Straw, green waste compost, and sawdust were able to immobilize between 54 and 68% of the N released by the cauliflower residues and reduced NO3- leaching by 56 to 68%. Paper sludge released an extra amount of N due to its low C/N ratio. No consistent remineralization of N could be found in any of the treatments, probably due to an unsuitable composition of the remineralizer wastes. Manipulating N release of N-rich crop residues by using organic wastes may be a suitable method to reduce NO3- leaching; however, stimulating remineralization of immobilized N by the start of the following spring may not be easy to achieve.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
N-MINERALIZATION, SOIL MINERAL NITROGEN, PLANT RESIDUES, STRAW INCORPORATION, LOW-TEMPERATURES, GREEN MANURE, MILL WASTE, MODEL, DENITRIFICATION, DECOMPOSITION
journal title
SOIL SCIENCE SOCIETY OF AMERICA JOURNAL
Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J.
volume
71
issue
4
pages
1240-1250 pages
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000248103200018
JCR category
SOIL SCIENCE
JCR impact factor
2.104 (2007)
JCR rank
4/29 (2007)
JCR quartile
1 (2007)
ISSN
0361-5995
DOI
10.2136/sssaj2005.0379
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
421044
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-421044
date created
2008-06-25 11:14:00
date last changed
2009-12-02 15:17:45
@article{421044,
  abstract     = {Following mineralization of N-rich crop residues, large amounts of mineral N can be released into the soil. Manipulating N mineralization of crop residues may be an option to reduce NO3- in soil. The potential to manipulate the N release from vegetable crop residues by using organic wastes was tested under field conditions. At the start of the experiment, cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L. var. botrytis L.) residues (similar to 73 Mg fresh matter ha(-1)) together with an immobilizer waste (similar to 5 Mg C ha(-1) of straw, green waste compost, sawdust, or paper sludge) were incorporated into a silt loam soil. After 154 d, a remineralizing waste (similar to 1 Mg C ha 1 of vinasse or dairy sludge) was incorporated. During the field experiment, the mineral N content in the soil was measured at regular time intervals, and net N release, NO3- leaching, and denitrification were simulated using a N mineralization-immobilization model coupled to a NO3- leaching model. Straw, green waste compost, and sawdust were able to immobilize between 54 and 68\% of the N released by the cauliflower residues and reduced NO3- leaching by 56 to 68\%. Paper sludge released an extra amount of N due to its low C/N ratio. No consistent remineralization of N could be found in any of the treatments, probably due to an unsuitable composition of the remineralizer wastes. Manipulating N release of N-rich crop residues by using organic wastes may be a suitable method to reduce NO3- leaching; however, stimulating remineralization of immobilized N by the start of the following spring may not be easy to achieve.},
  author       = {Chaves, Barbara and De Neve, Stefaan and Boeckx, Pascal and Van Cleemput, Oswald and Hofman, Georges},
  issn         = {0361-5995},
  journal      = {SOIL SCIENCE SOCIETY OF AMERICA JOURNAL},
  keyword      = {N-MINERALIZATION,SOIL MINERAL NITROGEN,PLANT RESIDUES,STRAW INCORPORATION,LOW-TEMPERATURES,GREEN MANURE,MILL WASTE,MODEL,DENITRIFICATION,DECOMPOSITION},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {1240--1250},
  title        = {Manipulating nitrogen release from nitrogen-rich crop residues using organic wastes under field conditions},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2136/sssaj2005.0379},
  volume       = {71},
  year         = {2007},
}

Chicago
Chaves, Barbara, Stefaan De Neve, Pascal Boeckx, Oswald Van Cleemput, and Georges Hofman. 2007. “Manipulating Nitrogen Release from Nitrogen-rich Crop Residues Using Organic Wastes Under Field Conditions.” Soil Science Society of America Journal 71 (4): 1240–1250.
APA
Chaves, Barbara, De Neve, S., Boeckx, P., Van Cleemput, O., & Hofman, G. (2007). Manipulating nitrogen release from nitrogen-rich crop residues using organic wastes under field conditions. SOIL SCIENCE SOCIETY OF AMERICA JOURNAL, 71(4), 1240–1250.
Vancouver
1.
Chaves B, De Neve S, Boeckx P, Van Cleemput O, Hofman G. Manipulating nitrogen release from nitrogen-rich crop residues using organic wastes under field conditions. SOIL SCIENCE SOCIETY OF AMERICA JOURNAL. 2007;71(4):1240–50.
MLA
Chaves, Barbara, Stefaan De Neve, Pascal Boeckx, et al. “Manipulating Nitrogen Release from Nitrogen-rich Crop Residues Using Organic Wastes Under Field Conditions.” SOIL SCIENCE SOCIETY OF AMERICA JOURNAL 71.4 (2007): 1240–1250. Print.