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Greenhouse gas emissions from rice microcosms amended with a plant microbial fuel cell

Jan Arends (UGent) , Jonas Speeckaert, Evelyne Blondeel (UGent) , Jo De Vrieze (UGent) , Pascal Boeckx (UGent) , Willy Verstraete (UGent) , Korneel Rabaey (UGent) and Nico Boon (UGent)
Author
Organization
Project
Biotechnology for a sustainable economy (Bio-Economy)
Project
PLANTPOWER (PlantPower - Living plants in microbial fuel cells for clean, renewable, sustainable, efficient, in-situ bioenergy production)
Abstract
Methane (CH4) release from wetlands is an important source of greenhouse gas emissions. Gas exchange occurs mainly through the aerenchyma of plants, and production of greenhouse gases is heavily dependent on rhizosphere biogeochemical conditions (i.e. substrate availability and redox potential). It is hypothesized that by introducing a biocatalyzed anode electrode in the rhizosphere of wetland plants, a competition for carbon and electrons can be invoked between electrical current-generating bacteria and methanogenic Archaea. The anode electrode is part of a bioelectrochemical system (BES) capable of harvesting electrical current from microbial metabolism. In this work, the anode of a BES was introduced in the rhizosphere of rice plants (Oryza sativa), and the impact on methane emissions was monitored. Microbial current generation was able to outcompete methanogenic processes when the bulk matrix contained low concentrations of organic carbon, provided that the electrical circuit with the effective electroactive microorganisms was in place. When interrupting the electrical circuit or supplying an excess of organic carbon, methanogenic metabolism was able to outcompete current generating metabolism. The qPCR results showed hydrogenotrophic methanogens were the most abundant methanogenic group present, while mixotrophic or acetoclastic methanogens were hardly detected in the bulk rhizosphere or on the electrodes. Competition for electron donor and acceptor were likely the main drivers to lower methane emissions. Overall, electrical current generation with BESs is an interesting option to control CH4 emissions from wetlands but needs to be applied in combination with other mitigation strategies to be successful and feasible in practice.
Keywords
Methane, Bioelectrochemical system, Microbial ecology, Hydrogenotrophic methanogens, Electrode material, Nitrous oxide, Rhizosphere, Oryza sativa, ELECTRICITY-GENERATION, METHANE EMISSION, NITROUS-OXIDE, ACTIVATED-SLUDGE, GROWTH, PADDY, SOIL, SEDIMENT, FIELDS, METHANOGENESIS

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Arends, Jan, Jonas Speeckaert, Evelyne Blondeel, Jo De Vrieze, Pascal Boeckx, Willy Verstraete, Korneel Rabaey, and Nico Boon. 2014. “Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Rice Microcosms Amended with a Plant Microbial Fuel Cell.” Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology 98 (7): 3205–3217.
APA
Arends, Jan, Speeckaert, J., Blondeel, E., De Vrieze, J., Boeckx, P., Verstraete, W., Rabaey, K., et al. (2014). Greenhouse gas emissions from rice microcosms amended with a plant microbial fuel cell. APPLIED MICROBIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY, 98(7), 3205–3217.
Vancouver
1.
Arends J, Speeckaert J, Blondeel E, De Vrieze J, Boeckx P, Verstraete W, et al. Greenhouse gas emissions from rice microcosms amended with a plant microbial fuel cell. APPLIED MICROBIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY. 2014;98(7):3205–17.
MLA
Arends, Jan, Jonas Speeckaert, Evelyne Blondeel, et al. “Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Rice Microcosms Amended with a Plant Microbial Fuel Cell.” APPLIED MICROBIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY 98.7 (2014): 3205–3217. Print.
@article{4195190,
  abstract     = {Methane (CH4) release from wetlands is an important source of greenhouse gas emissions. Gas exchange occurs mainly through the aerenchyma of plants, and production of greenhouse gases is heavily dependent on rhizosphere biogeochemical conditions (i.e. substrate availability and redox potential). It is hypothesized that by introducing a biocatalyzed anode electrode in the rhizosphere of wetland plants, a competition for carbon and electrons can be invoked between electrical current-generating bacteria and methanogenic Archaea. The anode electrode is part of a bioelectrochemical system (BES) capable of harvesting electrical current from microbial metabolism. In this work, the anode of a BES was introduced in the rhizosphere of rice plants (Oryza sativa), and the impact on methane emissions was monitored. Microbial current generation was able to outcompete methanogenic processes when the bulk matrix contained low concentrations of organic carbon, provided that the electrical circuit with the effective electroactive microorganisms was in place. When interrupting the electrical circuit or supplying an excess of organic carbon, methanogenic metabolism was able to outcompete current generating metabolism. The qPCR results showed hydrogenotrophic methanogens were the most abundant methanogenic group present, while mixotrophic or acetoclastic methanogens were hardly detected in the bulk rhizosphere or on the electrodes. Competition for electron donor and acceptor were likely the main drivers to lower methane emissions. Overall, electrical current generation with BESs is an interesting option to control CH4 emissions from wetlands but needs to be applied in combination with other mitigation strategies to be successful and feasible in practice.},
  author       = {Arends, Jan and Speeckaert, Jonas and Blondeel, Evelyne and De Vrieze, Jo and Boeckx, Pascal and Verstraete, Willy and Rabaey, Korneel and Boon, Nico},
  issn         = {0175-7598},
  journal      = {APPLIED MICROBIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY},
  keyword      = {Methane,Bioelectrochemical system,Microbial ecology,Hydrogenotrophic methanogens,Electrode material,Nitrous oxide,Rhizosphere,Oryza sativa,ELECTRICITY-GENERATION,METHANE EMISSION,NITROUS-OXIDE,ACTIVATED-SLUDGE,GROWTH,PADDY,SOIL,SEDIMENT,FIELDS,METHANOGENESIS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {3205--3217},
  title        = {Greenhouse gas emissions from rice microcosms amended with a plant microbial fuel cell},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00253-013-5328-5},
  volume       = {98},
  year         = {2014},
}

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