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Antimicrobial resistance in the food chain: a review

Claire Verraes, Sigrid Van Boxstael, Eva Van Meervenne, Els Van Coillie, Patrick Butaye UGent, Boudewijn Catry, Marie-Athenais de Schaetzen, Xavier Van Huffel, Hein Imberechts, Katelijne Dierick, et al. (2013) INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HEALTH. 10(7). p.2643-2669
abstract
Antimicrobial resistant zoonotic pathogens present on food constitute a direct risk to public health. Antimicrobial resistance genes in commensal or pathogenic strains form an indirect risk to public health, as they increase the gene pool from which pathogenic bacteria can pick up resistance traits. Food can be contaminated with antimicrobial resistant bacteria and/or antimicrobial resistance genes in several ways. A first way is the presence of antibiotic resistant bacteria on food selected by the use of antibiotics during agricultural production. A second route is the possible presence of resistance genes in bacteria that are intentionally added during the processing of food (starter cultures, probiotics, bioconserving microorganisms and bacteriophages). A last way is through cross-contamination with antimicrobial resistant bacteria during food processing. Raw food products can be consumed without having undergone prior processing or preservation and therefore hold a substantial risk for transfer of antimicrobial resistance to humans, as the eventually present resistant bacteria are not killed. As a consequence, transfer of antimicrobial resistance genes between bacteria after ingestion by humans may occur. Under minimal processing or preservation treatment conditions, sublethally damaged or stressed cells can be maintained in the food, inducing antimicrobial resistance build-up and enhancing the risk of resistance transfer. Food processes that kill bacteria in food products, decrease the risk of transmission of antimicrobial resistance.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (review)
publication status
published
subject
journal title
INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HEALTH
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health
volume
10
issue
7
pages
2643 - 2669
Web of Science type
Review
Web of Science id
000322182400003
JCR category
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
JCR impact factor
1.993 (2013)
JCR rank
90/216 (2013)
JCR quartile
2 (2013)
ISSN
1660-4601
DOI
10.3390/ijerph10072643
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have retained and own the full copyright for this publication
id
4174905
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-4174905
date created
2013-10-30 16:06:52
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:44:11
@article{4174905,
  abstract     = {Antimicrobial resistant zoonotic pathogens present on food constitute a direct risk to public health. Antimicrobial resistance genes in commensal or pathogenic strains form an indirect risk to public health, as they increase the gene pool from which pathogenic bacteria can pick up resistance traits. Food can be contaminated with antimicrobial resistant bacteria and/or antimicrobial resistance genes in several ways. A first way is the presence of antibiotic resistant bacteria on food selected by the use of antibiotics during agricultural production. A second route is the possible presence of resistance genes in bacteria that are intentionally added during the processing of food (starter cultures, probiotics, bioconserving microorganisms and bacteriophages). A last way is through cross-contamination with antimicrobial resistant bacteria during food processing. Raw food products can be consumed without having undergone prior processing or preservation and therefore hold a substantial risk for transfer of antimicrobial resistance to humans, as the eventually present resistant bacteria are not killed. As a consequence, transfer of antimicrobial resistance genes between bacteria after ingestion by humans may occur. Under minimal processing or preservation treatment conditions, sublethally damaged or stressed cells can be maintained in the food, inducing antimicrobial resistance build-up and enhancing the risk of resistance transfer. Food processes that kill bacteria in food products, decrease the risk of transmission of antimicrobial resistance.},
  author       = {Verraes, Claire and Van Boxstael, Sigrid and Van Meervenne, Eva and Van Coillie, Els and Butaye, Patrick and Catry, Boudewijn and de Schaetzen, Marie-Athenais and Van Huffel, Xavier and Imberechts, Hein and Dierick, Katelijne and Daube, Georges and Saegerman, Claude and De Block, Jan and Dewulf, Jeroen and Herman, Lieve},
  issn         = {1660-4601},
  journal      = {INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HEALTH},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {2643--2669},
  title        = {Antimicrobial resistance in the food chain: a review},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph10072643},
  volume       = {10},
  year         = {2013},
}

Chicago
Verraes, Claire, Sigrid Van Boxstael, Eva Van Meervenne, Els Van Coillie, Patrick Butaye, Boudewijn Catry, Marie-Athenais de Schaetzen, et al. 2013. “Antimicrobial Resistance in the Food Chain: a Review.” International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 10 (7): 2643–2669.
APA
Verraes, Claire, Van Boxstael, S., Van Meervenne, E., Van Coillie, E., Butaye, P., Catry, B., de Schaetzen, M.-A., et al. (2013). Antimicrobial resistance in the food chain: a review. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HEALTH, 10(7), 2643–2669.
Vancouver
1.
Verraes C, Van Boxstael S, Van Meervenne E, Van Coillie E, Butaye P, Catry B, et al. Antimicrobial resistance in the food chain: a review. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HEALTH. 2013;10(7):2643–69.
MLA
Verraes, Claire, Sigrid Van Boxstael, Eva Van Meervenne, et al. “Antimicrobial Resistance in the Food Chain: a Review.” INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HEALTH 10.7 (2013): 2643–2669. Print.