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Affective modulation of cognitive control is determined by performance-contingency and mediated by ventromedial prefrontal and cingulate cortex

Senne Braem UGent, Joseph King, Franziska Korb, Ruth Krebs UGent, Wim Notebaert UGent and Tobias Egner (2013) JOURNAL OF NEUROSCIENCE. 33(43). p.16961-16970
abstract
Cognitive control requires a fine balance between stability, the protection of an on-going task-set, and flexibility, the ability to update a task-set in line with changing contingencies. It is thought that emotional processing modulates this balance, but results have been equivocal regarding the direction of this modulation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that a crucial determinant of this modulation is whether affective stimuli represent performance-contingent or task-irrelevant signals. Combining functional magnetic resonance imaging with a conflict task-switching paradigm, we contrasted the effects of presenting negative- and positive-valence pictures on the stability/flexibility trade-off in humans, depending on whether picture presentation was contingent on behavioral performance. Both the behavioral and neural expressions of cognitive control were modulated by stimulus valence and performance contingency: in the performance-contingent condition, cognitive flexibility was enhanced following positive pictures, whereas in the nonperformance-contingent condition, positive stimuli promoted cognitive stability. The imaging data showed that, as anticipated, the stability/flexibility trade-off per se was reflected in differential recruitment of dorsolateral frontoparietal and striatal regions. In contrast, the affective modulation of stability/flexibility shifts was mirrored, unexpectedly, by neural responses in ventromedial prefrontal and posterior cingulate cortices, core nodes of the “default mode” network. Our results demonstrate that the affective modulation of cognitive control depends on the performance contingency of the affect-inducing stimuli, and they document medial default mode regions to mediate the flexibility-promoting effects of performance-contingent positive affect, thus extending recent work that recasts these regions as serving a key role in on-task control processes.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
MOTIVATED POSITIVE AFFECT, DEFAULT-MODE NETWORK, WORKING-MEMORY, HUMAN BRAIN, COMPUTATIONAL MODEL, NEGATIVE AFFECT, BASAL GANGLIA, CONFLICT, TASK, REWARD
journal title
JOURNAL OF NEUROSCIENCE
volume
33
issue
43
pages
16961 - 16970
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000326088500010
JCR category
NEUROSCIENCES
JCR impact factor
6.747 (2013)
JCR rank
24/252 (2013)
JCR quartile
1 (2013)
ISSN
0270-6474
DOI
10.1523/​JNEUROSCI.1208-13.2013
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
4171454
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-4171454
date created
2013-10-25 11:38:57
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:42:08
@article{4171454,
  abstract     = {Cognitive control requires a fine balance between stability, the protection of an on-going task-set, and flexibility, the ability to update a task-set in line with changing contingencies. It is thought that emotional processing modulates this balance, but results have been equivocal regarding the direction of this modulation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that a crucial determinant of this modulation is whether affective stimuli represent performance-contingent or task-irrelevant signals. Combining functional magnetic resonance imaging with a conflict task-switching paradigm, we contrasted the effects of presenting negative- and positive-valence pictures on the stability/flexibility trade-off in humans, depending on whether picture presentation was contingent on behavioral performance. Both the behavioral and neural expressions of cognitive control were modulated by stimulus valence and performance contingency: in the performance-contingent condition, cognitive flexibility was enhanced following positive pictures, whereas in the nonperformance-contingent condition, positive stimuli promoted cognitive stability. The imaging data showed that, as anticipated, the stability/flexibility trade-off per se was reflected in differential recruitment of dorsolateral frontoparietal and striatal regions. In contrast, the affective modulation of stability/flexibility shifts was mirrored, unexpectedly, by neural responses in ventromedial prefrontal and posterior cingulate cortices, core nodes of the {\textquotedblleft}default mode{\textquotedblright} network. Our results demonstrate that the affective modulation of cognitive control depends on the performance contingency of the affect-inducing stimuli, and they document medial default mode regions to mediate the flexibility-promoting effects of performance-contingent positive affect, thus extending recent work that recasts these regions as serving a key role in on-task control processes.},
  author       = {Braem, Senne and King, Joseph and Korb, Franziska and Krebs, Ruth and Notebaert, Wim and Egner, Tobias},
  issn         = {0270-6474},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF NEUROSCIENCE},
  keyword      = {MOTIVATED POSITIVE AFFECT,DEFAULT-MODE NETWORK,WORKING-MEMORY,HUMAN BRAIN,COMPUTATIONAL MODEL,NEGATIVE AFFECT,BASAL GANGLIA,CONFLICT,TASK,REWARD},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {43},
  pages        = {16961--16970},
  title        = {Affective modulation of cognitive control is determined by performance-contingency and mediated by ventromedial prefrontal and cingulate cortex},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1523/\unmatched{200b}JNEUROSCI.1208-13.2013},
  volume       = {33},
  year         = {2013},
}

Chicago
Braem, Senne, Joseph King, Franziska Korb, Ruth Krebs, Wim Notebaert, and Tobias Egner. 2013. “Affective Modulation of Cognitive Control Is Determined by Performance-contingency and Mediated by Ventromedial Prefrontal and Cingulate Cortex.” Journal of Neuroscience 33 (43): 16961–16970.
APA
Braem, S., King, J., Korb, F., Krebs, R., Notebaert, W., & Egner, T. (2013). Affective modulation of cognitive control is determined by performance-contingency and mediated by ventromedial prefrontal and cingulate cortex. JOURNAL OF NEUROSCIENCE, 33(43), 16961–16970.
Vancouver
1.
Braem S, King J, Korb F, Krebs R, Notebaert W, Egner T. Affective modulation of cognitive control is determined by performance-contingency and mediated by ventromedial prefrontal and cingulate cortex. JOURNAL OF NEUROSCIENCE. 2013;33(43):16961–70.
MLA
Braem, Senne, Joseph King, Franziska Korb, et al. “Affective Modulation of Cognitive Control Is Determined by Performance-contingency and Mediated by Ventromedial Prefrontal and Cingulate Cortex.” JOURNAL OF NEUROSCIENCE 33.43 (2013): 16961–16970. Print.