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Anatomical differences in the human inferior colliculus relate to the perceived valence of musical consonance and dissonance

Thomas Fritz, Wiske Renders, Karsten Müller, Paul Schmude, Marc Leman UGent, Robert Turner and Arno Villringer (2013) EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF NEUROSCIENCE. 38(7). p.3099-3105
abstract
Helmholtz himself speculated about a role of the cochlea in the perception of musical dissonance. Here we indirectly investigated this issue, assessing the valence judgment of musical stimuli with variable consonance/dissonance and presented diotically (exactly the same dissonant signal was presented to both ears) or dichotically (a consonant signal was presented to each ear - both consonant signals were rhythmically identical but differed by a semitone in pitch). Differences in brain organisation underlying inter-subject differences in the percept of dichotically presented dissonance were determined with voxel-based morphometry. Behavioral results showed that diotic dissonant stimuli were perceived as more unpleasant than dichotically presented dissonance, indicating that interactions within the cochlea modulated the valence percept during dissonance. However, the behavioral data also suggested that the dissonance percept did not depend crucially on the cochlea, but also occurred as a result of binaural integration when listening to dichotic dissonance. These results also showed substantial between-participant variations in the valence response to dichotic dissonance. These differences were in a voxel-based morphometry analysis related to differences in gray matter density in the inferior colliculus, which strongly substantiated a key role of the inferior colliculus in consonance/dissonance representation in humans.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
UNDERLYING MECHANISMS, CYTOARCHITECTONIC MAPS, HUMAN BRAIN, VOXEL-BASED MORPHOMETRY, EMOTIONAL RESPONSES, NEURAL MECHANISMS, UNPLEASANT MUSIC, HEARING-LOSS, PITCH, ATTENTION, aesthetics, dichotic, inferior colliculus, music, pulvinar, roughness
journal title
EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF NEUROSCIENCE
editor
Jean-Marc Fritschy and Martin Sarter
volume
38
issue
7
pages
3099 - 3105
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000325468500015
JCR category
NEUROSCIENCES
JCR impact factor
3.669 (2013)
JCR rank
85/252 (2013)
JCR quartile
2 (2013)
ISSN
0953-816X
DOI
10.1111/ejn.12305
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
4168598
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-4168598
date created
2013-10-22 11:21:20
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:40:52
@article{4168598,
  abstract     = {Helmholtz himself speculated about a role of the cochlea in the perception of musical dissonance. Here we indirectly investigated this issue, assessing the valence judgment of musical stimuli with variable consonance/dissonance and presented diotically (exactly the same dissonant signal was presented to both ears) or dichotically (a consonant signal was presented to each ear - both consonant signals were rhythmically identical but differed by a semitone in pitch). Differences in brain organisation underlying inter-subject differences in the percept of dichotically presented dissonance were determined with voxel-based morphometry. Behavioral results showed that diotic dissonant stimuli were perceived as more unpleasant than dichotically presented dissonance, indicating that interactions within the cochlea modulated the valence percept during dissonance. However, the behavioral data also suggested that the dissonance percept did not depend crucially on the cochlea, but also occurred as a result of binaural integration when listening to dichotic dissonance. These results also showed substantial between-participant variations in the valence response to dichotic dissonance. These differences were in a voxel-based morphometry analysis related to differences in gray matter density in the inferior colliculus, which strongly substantiated a key role of the inferior colliculus in consonance/dissonance representation in humans.},
  author       = {Fritz, Thomas and Renders, Wiske and M{\"u}ller, Karsten and Schmude, Paul and Leman, Marc and Turner, Robert and Villringer, Arno},
  editor       = {Fritschy, Jean-Marc and Sarter, Martin},
  issn         = {0953-816X},
  journal      = {EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF NEUROSCIENCE},
  keyword      = {UNDERLYING MECHANISMS,CYTOARCHITECTONIC MAPS,HUMAN BRAIN,VOXEL-BASED MORPHOMETRY,EMOTIONAL RESPONSES,NEURAL MECHANISMS,UNPLEASANT MUSIC,HEARING-LOSS,PITCH,ATTENTION,aesthetics,dichotic,inferior colliculus,music,pulvinar,roughness},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {3099--3105},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  title        = {Anatomical differences in the human inferior colliculus relate to the perceived valence of musical consonance and dissonance},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ejn.12305},
  volume       = {38},
  year         = {2013},
}

Chicago
Fritz, Thomas, Wiske Renders, Karsten Müller, Paul Schmude, Marc Leman, Robert Turner, and Arno Villringer. 2013. “Anatomical Differences in the Human Inferior Colliculus Relate to the Perceived Valence of Musical Consonance and Dissonance.” Ed. Jean-Marc Fritschy and Martin Sarter. European Journal of Neuroscience 38 (7): 3099–3105.
APA
Fritz, T., Renders, W., Müller, K., Schmude, P., Leman, M., Turner, R., & Villringer, A. (2013). Anatomical differences in the human inferior colliculus relate to the perceived valence of musical consonance and dissonance. (J.-M. Fritschy & M. Sarter, Eds.)EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF NEUROSCIENCE, 38(7), 3099–3105.
Vancouver
1.
Fritz T, Renders W, Müller K, Schmude P, Leman M, Turner R, et al. Anatomical differences in the human inferior colliculus relate to the perceived valence of musical consonance and dissonance. Fritschy J-M, Sarter M, editors. EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF NEUROSCIENCE. Wiley-Blackwell; 2013;38(7):3099–105.
MLA
Fritz, Thomas, Wiske Renders, Karsten Müller, et al. “Anatomical Differences in the Human Inferior Colliculus Relate to the Perceived Valence of Musical Consonance and Dissonance.” Ed. Jean-Marc Fritschy & Martin Sarter. EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF NEUROSCIENCE 38.7 (2013): 3099–3105. Print.