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The curious case of curiosity: unpleasant advertising and curiosity

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Abstract
Previous research demonstrated that advertisements that induce positive feelings are effective. However, unpleasant advertising are frequently used and can be effective as well. This research examines whether evoked curiosity can explain the effectiveness of unpleasant advertising. Our results indicate that although unpleasant advertising did not lead to behavioral intention with regard to the advertised product, unpleasant advertising did evoke curiosity. Curiosity itself proves to be a strong predictor of behavioral intention.
Keywords
advertising, negative appeals, pleasure, curiosity, marketing

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Van den Driessche, Liesbet, Iris Vermeir, and Mario Pandelaere. “The Curious Case of Curiosity: Unpleasant Advertising and Curiosity.” European Marketing Academy, Proceedings. 2013. 1–7. Print.
APA
Van den Driessche, Liesbet, Vermeir, I., & Pandelaere, M. (2013). The curious case of curiosity: unpleasant advertising and curiosity. European Marketing Academy, Proceedings (pp. 1–7). Presented at the European Marketing Academy (EMAC - 2013).
Chicago author-date
Van den Driessche, Liesbet, Iris Vermeir, and Mario Pandelaere. 2013. “The Curious Case of Curiosity: Unpleasant Advertising and Curiosity.” In European Marketing Academy, Proceedings, 1–7.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Van den Driessche, Liesbet, Iris Vermeir, and Mario Pandelaere. 2013. “The Curious Case of Curiosity: Unpleasant Advertising and Curiosity.” In European Marketing Academy, Proceedings, 1–7.
Vancouver
1.
Van den Driessche L, Vermeir I, Pandelaere M. The curious case of curiosity: unpleasant advertising and curiosity. European Marketing Academy, Proceedings. 2013. p. 1–7.
IEEE
[1]
L. Van den Driessche, I. Vermeir, and M. Pandelaere, “The curious case of curiosity: unpleasant advertising and curiosity,” in European Marketing Academy, Proceedings, Istanbul, Turkey, 2013, pp. 1–7.
@inproceedings{4164165,
  abstract     = {Previous research demonstrated that advertisements that induce positive feelings are effective. However, unpleasant advertising are frequently used and can be effective as well. This research examines whether evoked curiosity can explain the effectiveness of unpleasant advertising. Our results indicate that although unpleasant advertising did not lead to behavioral intention with regard to the advertised product, unpleasant advertising did evoke curiosity. Curiosity itself proves to be a strong predictor of behavioral intention.},
  author       = {Van den Driessche, Liesbet and Vermeir, Iris and Pandelaere, Mario},
  booktitle    = {European Marketing Academy, Proceedings},
  keywords     = {advertising,negative appeals,pleasure,curiosity,marketing},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Istanbul, Turkey},
  pages        = {1--7},
  title        = {The curious case of curiosity: unpleasant advertising and curiosity},
  year         = {2013},
}