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Use of Staby® technology for development and production of DNA vaccines free of antibiotic resistance gene

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Abstract
The appearance of new viruses and the cost of developing certain vaccines require that new vaccination strategies now have to be developed. DNA vaccination seems to be a particularly promising method. For this application, plasmid DNA is injected into the subject (man or animal). This plasmid DNA encodes an antigen that will be expressed by the cells of the subject. In addition to the antigen, the plasmid also encodes a resistance to an antibiotic, which is used during the construction and production steps of the plasmid. However, regulatory agencies (FDA, USDA and EMA) recommend to avoid the use of antibiotics resistance genes. Delphi Genetics developed the Staby® technology to replace the antibiotic-resistance gene by a selection system that relies on two bacterial genes. These genes are small in size (approximately 200 to 300 bases each) and consequently encode two small proteins. They are naturally present in the genomes of bacteria and on plasmids. The technology is already used successfully for production of recombinant proteins to achieve higher yields and without the need of antibiotics. In the field of DNA vaccines, we have now the first data validating the innocuousness of this Staby® technology for eukaryotic cells and the feasibility of an industrial production of an antibiotic-free DNA vaccine. Moreover, as a proof of concept, mice have been successfully vaccinated with our antibiotic-free DNA vaccine against a deadly disease, pseudorabies (induced by Suid herpesvirus-1).
Keywords
antibiotic-free, ccdA, Staby, Aujeszky’s disease, DNA vaccine, ccdB, electrotransfer

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MLA
Reschner, Anca, Sophie Scohy, Gaëlle Vandermeulen, et al. “Use of Staby® Technology for Development and Production of DNA Vaccines Free of Antibiotic Resistance Gene.” Ed. Kenneth E Ugen & David B Weiner. HUMAN VACCINES & IMMUNOTHERAPEUTICS 9.10 (2013): 2203–2210. Print.
APA
Reschner, A., Scohy, S., Vandermeulen, G., Daukandt, M., Jacques, C., Michel, B., Nauwynck, H., et al. (2013). Use of Staby® technology for development and production of DNA vaccines free of antibiotic resistance gene. (K. E. Ugen & D. B. Weiner, Eds.)HUMAN VACCINES & IMMUNOTHERAPEUTICS, 9(10), 2203–2210.
Chicago author-date
Reschner, Anca, Sophie Scohy, Gaëlle Vandermeulen, Marc Daukandt, Céline Jacques, Benjamin Michel, Hans Nauwynck, et al. 2013. “Use of Staby® Technology for Development and Production of DNA Vaccines Free of Antibiotic Resistance Gene.” Ed. Kenneth E Ugen and David B Weiner. Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics 9 (10): 2203–2210.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Reschner, Anca, Sophie Scohy, Gaëlle Vandermeulen, Marc Daukandt, Céline Jacques, Benjamin Michel, Hans Nauwynck, Florence Xhonneux, Véronique Préat, Alain Vanderplasschen, and Cédric Szpirer. 2013. “Use of Staby® Technology for Development and Production of DNA Vaccines Free of Antibiotic Resistance Gene.” Ed. Kenneth E Ugen and David B Weiner. Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics 9 (10): 2203–2210.
Vancouver
1.
Reschner A, Scohy S, Vandermeulen G, Daukandt M, Jacques C, Michel B, et al. Use of Staby® technology for development and production of DNA vaccines free of antibiotic resistance gene. Ugen KE, Weiner DB, editors. HUMAN VACCINES & IMMUNOTHERAPEUTICS. 2013;9(10):2203–10.
IEEE
[1]
A. Reschner et al., “Use of Staby® technology for development and production of DNA vaccines free of antibiotic resistance gene,” HUMAN VACCINES & IMMUNOTHERAPEUTICS, vol. 9, no. 10, pp. 2203–2210, 2013.
@article{4160221,
  abstract     = {{The appearance of new viruses and the cost of developing certain vaccines require that new vaccination strategies now have to be developed. DNA vaccination seems to be a particularly promising method. For this application, plasmid DNA is injected into the subject (man or animal). This plasmid DNA encodes an antigen that will be expressed by the cells of the subject. In addition to the antigen, the plasmid also encodes a resistance to an antibiotic, which is used during the construction and production steps of the plasmid. However, regulatory agencies (FDA, USDA and EMA) recommend to avoid the use of antibiotics resistance genes. Delphi Genetics developed the Staby® technology to replace the antibiotic-resistance gene by a selection system that relies on two bacterial genes. These genes are small in size (approximately 200 to 300 bases each) and consequently encode two small proteins. They are naturally present in the genomes of bacteria and on plasmids. The technology is already used successfully for production of recombinant proteins to achieve higher yields and without the need of antibiotics. In the field of DNA vaccines, we have now the first data validating the innocuousness of this Staby® technology for eukaryotic cells and the feasibility of an industrial production of an antibiotic-free DNA vaccine. Moreover, as a proof of concept, mice have been successfully vaccinated with our antibiotic-free DNA vaccine against a deadly disease, pseudorabies (induced by Suid herpesvirus-1).}},
  author       = {{Reschner, Anca and Scohy, Sophie and Vandermeulen, Gaëlle and Daukandt, Marc and Jacques, Céline and Michel, Benjamin and Nauwynck, Hans and Xhonneux, Florence and Préat, Véronique and Vanderplasschen, Alain and Szpirer, Cédric}},
  editor       = {{Ugen, Kenneth E and Weiner, David B}},
  issn         = {{2164-5515}},
  journal      = {{HUMAN VACCINES & IMMUNOTHERAPEUTICS}},
  keywords     = {{antibiotic-free,ccdA,Staby,Aujeszky’s disease,DNA vaccine,ccdB,electrotransfer}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{10}},
  pages        = {{2203--2210}},
  title        = {{Use of Staby® technology for development and production of DNA vaccines free of antibiotic resistance gene}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.4161/hv.25086}},
  volume       = {{9}},
  year         = {{2013}},
}

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