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Differences between Flemish and Chinese primary students' mastery of basic arithmetic operations

Ningning Zhao (UGent) , Martin Valcke (UGent) , Annemie Desoete (UGent) , Elise Burny (UGent) and Ineke Imbo (UGent)
(2014) EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY. 34(7). p.818-837
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Abstract
The present paper investigates differences in the process of mastering the four basic arithmetic operations (addition, subtraction, multiplication and division) between Flemish and Chinese children from Grade 3 till Grade 6 (i.e. from 8 to 11years old). The results showed, firstly, that Chinese students outperformed Flemish students in each grade but that difference in addition, subtraction and division skills between the groups decreased as grade increased. Secondly, the levels of mastery of the four skills varied between Chinese and Flemish students. Multiplication was relatively easier for Chinese students than for their Flemish peers as compared to the other skills (that is, the gap was larger). Third, low achievers experienced comparable learning difficulties in both countries, and higher achievers demonstrated their greater ability early on.
Keywords
SINGLE-DIGIT ADDITION, EVENT-RELATED POTENTIALS, WORKING-MEMORY, MULTIPLICATION, PERFORMANCE, MATHEMATICS, CHILDREN, SUBTRACTION, DIVISION, LANGUAGE, Flemish, fact retrieval, basic arithmetic skills, Chinese, mathematics

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Chicago
Zhao, Ningning, Martin Valcke, Annemie Desoete, Elise Burny, and Ineke Imbo. 2014. “Differences Between Flemish and Chinese Primary Students’ Mastery of Basic Arithmetic Operations.” Educational Psychology 34 (7): 818–837.
APA
Zhao, N., Valcke, M., Desoete, A., Burny, E., & Imbo, I. (2014). Differences between Flemish and Chinese primary students’ mastery of basic arithmetic operations. EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY, 34(7), 818–837.
Vancouver
1.
Zhao N, Valcke M, Desoete A, Burny E, Imbo I. Differences between Flemish and Chinese primary students’ mastery of basic arithmetic operations. EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY. 2014;34(7):818–37.
MLA
Zhao, Ningning, Martin Valcke, Annemie Desoete, et al. “Differences Between Flemish and Chinese Primary Students’ Mastery of Basic Arithmetic Operations.” EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 34.7 (2014): 818–837. Print.
@article{4158763,
  abstract     = {The present paper investigates differences in the process of mastering the four basic arithmetic operations (addition, subtraction, multiplication and division) between Flemish and Chinese children from Grade 3 till Grade 6 (i.e. from 8 to 11years old). The results showed, firstly, that Chinese students outperformed Flemish students in each grade but that difference in addition, subtraction and division skills between the groups decreased as grade increased. Secondly, the levels of mastery of the four skills varied between Chinese and Flemish students. Multiplication was relatively easier for Chinese students than for their Flemish peers as compared to the other skills (that is, the gap was larger). Third, low achievers experienced comparable learning difficulties in both countries, and higher achievers demonstrated their greater ability early on.},
  author       = {Zhao, Ningning and Valcke, Martin and Desoete, Annemie and Burny, Elise and Imbo, Ineke},
  issn         = {0144-3410},
  journal      = {EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY},
  keyword      = {SINGLE-DIGIT ADDITION,EVENT-RELATED POTENTIALS,WORKING-MEMORY,MULTIPLICATION,PERFORMANCE,MATHEMATICS,CHILDREN,SUBTRACTION,DIVISION,LANGUAGE,Flemish,fact retrieval,basic arithmetic skills,Chinese,mathematics},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {818--837},
  title        = {Differences between Flemish and Chinese primary students' mastery of basic arithmetic operations},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01443410.2013.832150},
  volume       = {34},
  year         = {2014},
}

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