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'Magis rythmus quam metron': the structure of Seneca's anapaests, and the oral/aural nature of Latin poetry

(2013) SYMBOLAE OSLOENSES. 87(1). p.148-217
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Abstract
The aim of this contribution is twofold. The empirical focus is the metrical structure of Seneca's anapaestic odes. On the basis of a detailed formal analysis, in which special attention is paid to the delimitation and internal structure of metrical periods, I argue against the dimeter colometry traditionally assumed. This conclusion in turn is based on a second, more methodological claim, namely that in establishing the colometry of an ancient piece of poetry, the modern metrician is only allowed to set apart a given string of metrical elements as a separate metron, colon or period, if this postulated metrical entity could 'aurally' be distinguished as such by the hearer.
Keywords
orality, anapaests, Seneca, METER, rhythm, metre, ANTIQUITY

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Chicago
Danckaert, Lieven. 2013. “‘Magis Rythmus Quam Metron’: The Structure of Seneca’s Anapaests, and the Oral/aural Nature of Latin Poetry.” Symbolae Osloenses 87 (1): 148–217.
APA
Danckaert, L. (2013). “Magis rythmus quam metron”: the structure of Seneca’s anapaests, and the oral/aural nature of Latin poetry. SYMBOLAE OSLOENSES, 87(1), 148–217.
Vancouver
1.
Danckaert L. “Magis rythmus quam metron”: the structure of Seneca’s anapaests, and the oral/aural nature of Latin poetry. SYMBOLAE OSLOENSES. 2013;87(1):148–217.
MLA
Danckaert, Lieven. “‘Magis Rythmus Quam Metron’: The Structure of Seneca’s Anapaests, and the Oral/aural Nature of Latin Poetry.” SYMBOLAE OSLOENSES 87.1 (2013): 148–217. Print.
@article{4144321,
  abstract     = {The aim of this contribution is twofold. The empirical focus is the metrical structure of Seneca's anapaestic odes. On the basis of a detailed formal analysis, in which special attention is paid to the delimitation and internal structure of metrical periods, I argue against the dimeter colometry traditionally assumed. This conclusion in turn is based on a second, more methodological claim, namely that in establishing the colometry of an ancient piece of poetry, the modern metrician is only allowed to set apart a given string of metrical elements as a separate metron, colon or period, if this postulated metrical entity could 'aurally' be distinguished as such by the hearer.},
  author       = {Danckaert, Lieven},
  issn         = {0039-7679},
  journal      = {SYMBOLAE OSLOENSES},
  keyword      = {orality,anapaests,Seneca,METER,rhythm,metre,ANTIQUITY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {148--217},
  title        = {'Magis rythmus quam metron': the structure of Seneca's anapaests, and the oral/aural nature of Latin poetry},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00397679.2013.842310},
  volume       = {87},
  year         = {2013},
}

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