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Cell to whole-plant phenotyping: the best is yet to come

Stijn Dhondt (UGent) , Nathalie Wuyts (UGent) and Dirk Inzé (UGent)
(2013) TRENDS IN PLANT SCIENCE. 18(8). p.433-444
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Biotechnology for a sustainable economy (Bio-Economy)
Abstract
Imaging and image processing have revolutionized plant phenotyping and are now a major tool for phenotypic trait measurement. Here we review plant phenotyping systems by examining three important characteristics: throughput, dimensionality, and resolution. First, whole-plant phenotyping systems are highlighted together with advances in automation that enable significant throughput increases. Organ and cellular level phenotyping and its tools, often operating at a lower throughput, are then discussed as a means to obtain high-dimensional phenotypic data at elevated spatial and temporal resolution. The significance of recent developments in sensor technologies that give access to plant morphology and physiology-related traits is shown. Overall, attention is focused on spatial and temporal resolution because these are crucial aspects of imaging procedures in plant phenotyping systems.
Keywords
ROOT-SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE, CHLOROPHYLL FLUORESCENCE, RAY COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY, IMAGE ANALYSIS TOOL, ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA, LEAF GROWTH, QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS, GENE EXPRESSION, AUTOMATIC QUANTIFICATION, WATER-DEFICIT

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Dhondt, Stijn, Nathalie Wuyts, and Dirk Inzé. 2013. “Cell to Whole-plant Phenotyping: The Best Is yet to Come.” Trends in Plant Science 18 (8): 433–444.
APA
Dhondt, S., Wuyts, N., & Inzé, D. (2013). Cell to whole-plant phenotyping: the best is yet to come. TRENDS IN PLANT SCIENCE, 18(8), 433–444.
Vancouver
1.
Dhondt S, Wuyts N, Inzé D. Cell to whole-plant phenotyping: the best is yet to come. TRENDS IN PLANT SCIENCE. 2013;18(8):433–44.
MLA
Dhondt, Stijn, Nathalie Wuyts, and Dirk Inzé. “Cell to Whole-plant Phenotyping: The Best Is yet to Come.” TRENDS IN PLANT SCIENCE 18.8 (2013): 433–444. Print.
@article{4143928,
  abstract     = {Imaging and image processing have revolutionized plant phenotyping and are now a major tool for phenotypic trait measurement. Here we review plant phenotyping systems by examining three important characteristics: throughput, dimensionality, and resolution. First, whole-plant phenotyping systems are highlighted together with advances in automation that enable significant throughput increases. Organ and cellular level phenotyping and its tools, often operating at a lower throughput, are then discussed as a means to obtain high-dimensional phenotypic data at elevated spatial and temporal resolution. The significance of recent developments in sensor technologies that give access to plant morphology and physiology-related traits is shown. Overall, attention is focused on spatial and temporal resolution because these are crucial aspects of imaging procedures in plant phenotyping systems.},
  author       = {Dhondt, Stijn and Wuyts, Nathalie and Inz{\'e}, Dirk},
  issn         = {1360-1385},
  journal      = {TRENDS IN PLANT SCIENCE},
  keyword      = {ROOT-SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE,CHLOROPHYLL FLUORESCENCE,RAY COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY,IMAGE ANALYSIS TOOL,ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA,LEAF GROWTH,QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS,GENE EXPRESSION,AUTOMATIC QUANTIFICATION,WATER-DEFICIT},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {433--444},
  title        = {Cell to whole-plant phenotyping: the best is yet to come},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tplants.2013.04.008},
  volume       = {18},
  year         = {2013},
}

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