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Design and performance of a compact and stationary microSPECT system

Roel Van Holen UGent, Bert Vandeghinste UGent, Karel Deprez UGent and Stefaan Vandenberghe UGent (2013) MEDICAL PHYSICS. 40(11). p.112501-1-11250-11
abstract
Purpose: Over the last ten years, there has been an extensive growth in the development of microSPECT imagers. Most of the systems are based on the combination of conventional, relatively large gamma cameras with poor intrinsic spatial resolution and multipinhole collimators working in large magnification mode. Spatial resolutions range from 0.58 to 0.76 mm while peak sensitivities vary from 0.06% to 0.4%. While pushing the limits of performance is of major importance, the authors believe that there is a need for smaller and less complex systems that bring along a reduced cost. While low footprint and low-cost systems can make microSPECT available to more researchers, the ease of operation and calibration and low maintenance cost are additional factors that can facilitate the use of microSPECT in molecular imaging. In this paper, the authors simulate the performance of a microSPECT imager that combines high space-bandwidth detectors and pinholes with truncated projection, resulting in a small and stationary system. Methods: A system optimization algorithm is used to determine the optimal SPECT systems, given our high resolutions detectors and a fixed field-of-view. These optimal system geometries are then used to simulate a Defrise disk phantom and a hot rod phantom. Finally, a MOBY mouse phantom, with realistic concentrations of Tc99m-tetrofosmin is simulated. Results: Results show that the authors can successfully reconstruct a Defrise disk phantom of 24 mm in diameter without any rotating system components or translation of the object. Reconstructed spatial resolution is approximately 800 mu m while the peak sensitivity is 0.23%. Finally, the simulation of the MOBY mouse phantom shows that the authors can accurately reconstruct mouse images. Conclusions: These results show that pinholes with truncated projections can be used in small magnification or minification mode to obtain a compact and stationary microSPECT system. The authors showed that they can reach state-of-the-art system performance and can successfully reconstruct images with realistic noise levels in a preclinical context. Such a system can be useful for dynamic SPECT imaging. 2013 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
pinhole, multi-pinhole, IMAGER, SINGLE, TOMOGRAPHY, COLLIMATOR, RESOLUTION, BRAIN SPECT, SMALL ANIMAL SPECT, ANALYTIC DETERMINATION, PINHOLE SPECT, SPECT, molecular imaging, instrumentation
journal title
MEDICAL PHYSICS
editor
William Hendee
volume
40
issue
11
pages
112501-1 - 11250-11
publisher
AAPM
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000326991800054
JCR category
RADIOLOGY, NUCLEAR MEDICINE & MEDICAL IMAGING
JCR impact factor
3.012 (2013)
JCR rank
25/122 (2013)
JCR quartile
1 (2013)
ISSN
0094-2405
DOI
10.1118/1.4822621
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
4131121
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-4131121
date created
2013-09-12 13:40:22
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:43:01
@article{4131121,
  abstract     = {Purpose: Over the last ten years, there has been an extensive growth in the development of microSPECT imagers. Most of the systems are based on the combination of conventional, relatively large gamma cameras with poor intrinsic spatial resolution and multipinhole collimators working in large magnification mode. Spatial resolutions range from 0.58 to 0.76 mm while peak sensitivities vary from 0.06\% to 0.4\%. While pushing the limits of performance is of major importance, the authors believe that there is a need for smaller and less complex systems that bring along a reduced cost. While low footprint and low-cost systems can make microSPECT available to more researchers, the ease of operation and calibration and low maintenance cost are additional factors that can facilitate the use of microSPECT in molecular imaging. In this paper, the authors simulate the performance of a microSPECT imager that combines high space-bandwidth detectors and pinholes with truncated projection, resulting in a small and stationary system. Methods: A system optimization algorithm is used to determine the optimal SPECT systems, given our high resolutions detectors and a fixed field-of-view. These optimal system geometries are then used to simulate a Defrise disk phantom and a hot rod phantom. Finally, a MOBY mouse phantom, with realistic concentrations of Tc99m-tetrofosmin is simulated. Results: Results show that the authors can successfully reconstruct a Defrise disk phantom of 24 mm in diameter without any rotating system components or translation of the object. Reconstructed spatial resolution is approximately 800 mu m while the peak sensitivity is 0.23\%. Finally, the simulation of the MOBY mouse phantom shows that the authors can accurately reconstruct mouse images. Conclusions: These results show that pinholes with truncated projections can be used in small magnification or minification mode to obtain a compact and stationary microSPECT system. The authors showed that they can reach state-of-the-art system performance and can successfully reconstruct images with realistic noise levels in a preclinical context. Such a system can be useful for dynamic SPECT imaging. 2013 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.},
  author       = {Van Holen, Roel and Vandeghinste, Bert and Deprez, Karel and Vandenberghe, Stefaan},
  editor       = {Hendee, William},
  issn         = {0094-2405},
  journal      = {MEDICAL PHYSICS},
  keyword      = {pinhole,multi-pinhole,IMAGER,SINGLE,TOMOGRAPHY,COLLIMATOR,RESOLUTION,BRAIN SPECT,SMALL ANIMAL SPECT,ANALYTIC DETERMINATION,PINHOLE SPECT,SPECT,molecular imaging,instrumentation},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {112501-1--11250-11},
  publisher    = {AAPM},
  title        = {Design and performance of a compact and stationary microSPECT system},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1118/1.4822621},
  volume       = {40},
  year         = {2013},
}

Chicago
Van Holen, Roel, Bert Vandeghinste, Karel Deprez, and Stefaan Vandenberghe. 2013. “Design and Performance of a Compact and Stationary microSPECT System.” Ed. William Hendee. Medical Physics 40 (11): 112501–1–11250–11.
APA
Van Holen, R., Vandeghinste, B., Deprez, K., & Vandenberghe, S. (2013). Design and performance of a compact and stationary microSPECT system. (W. Hendee, Ed.)MEDICAL PHYSICS, 40(11), 112501–1–11250–11.
Vancouver
1.
Van Holen R, Vandeghinste B, Deprez K, Vandenberghe S. Design and performance of a compact and stationary microSPECT system. Hendee W, editor. MEDICAL PHYSICS. AAPM; 2013;40(11):112501–1–11250–11.
MLA
Van Holen, Roel, Bert Vandeghinste, Karel Deprez, et al. “Design and Performance of a Compact and Stationary microSPECT System.” Ed. William Hendee. MEDICAL PHYSICS 40.11 (2013): 112501–1–11250–11. Print.