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Strong and weak regress arguments

(2013) LOGIQUE ET ANALYSE. 224. p.439-461
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Abstract
In the literature, regress arguments often take one of two different forms: either they conclude that a given solution fails to solve any problem of a certain kind (the strong conclusion), or they conclude that a given solution fails to solve all problems of a certain kind (the weaker conclusion). This gives rise to a logical problem: do regresses entail the strong or the weaker conclusion, or none? In this paper I demonstrate that regress arguments can in fact take both forms, and clearly set out the logical difference between them. Throughout the paper, I confine myself to metaphysical examples from the early Russell. Only now that we know they are valid can we start to discuss whether they are sound.
Keywords
BRADLEYS REGRESS

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MLA
Wieland, Jan Willem. “Strong and Weak Regress Arguments.” LOGIQUE ET ANALYSE 224 (2013): 439–461. Print.
APA
Wieland, J. W. (2013). Strong and weak regress arguments. LOGIQUE ET ANALYSE, 224, 439–461.
Chicago author-date
Wieland, Jan Willem. 2013. “Strong and Weak Regress Arguments.” Logique Et Analyse 224: 439–461.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Wieland, Jan Willem. 2013. “Strong and Weak Regress Arguments.” Logique Et Analyse 224: 439–461.
Vancouver
1.
Wieland JW. Strong and weak regress arguments. LOGIQUE ET ANALYSE. 2013;224:439–61.
IEEE
[1]
J. W. Wieland, “Strong and weak regress arguments,” LOGIQUE ET ANALYSE, vol. 224, pp. 439–461, 2013.
@article{4128365,
  abstract     = {{In the literature, regress arguments often take one of two different forms: either they conclude that a given solution fails to solve any problem of a certain kind (the strong conclusion), or they conclude that a given solution fails to solve all problems of a certain kind (the weaker conclusion). This gives rise to a logical problem: do regresses entail the strong or the weaker conclusion, or none? In this paper I demonstrate that regress arguments can in fact take both forms, and clearly set out the logical difference between them. Throughout the paper, I confine myself to metaphysical examples from the early Russell. Only now that we know they are valid can we start to discuss whether they are sound.}},
  author       = {{Wieland, Jan Willem}},
  issn         = {{0024-5836}},
  journal      = {{LOGIQUE ET ANALYSE}},
  keywords     = {{BRADLEYS REGRESS}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  pages        = {{439--461}},
  title        = {{Strong and weak regress arguments}},
  volume       = {{224}},
  year         = {{2013}},
}

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