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Can soil acidity and light help to explain tree species effects on forest herb layer performance in post-agricultural forests?

Arno Thomaes, Luc De Keersmaeker, An De Schrijver UGent, Lander Baeten UGent, Kris Vandekerkhove, Gorik Verstraeten UGent and Kris Verheyen UGent (2013) PLANT AND SOIL. 373(1-2). p.183-199
abstract
Aims: Tree species affect herb layer species through their effects on soil quality and light regime but their relative importance and interactions are insufficiently known. Methods: Pot experiment with soil taken from stands planted with tree species with contrasting effects on soil acidification, two light regimes and six forest perennials. Results: The survival or growth of Mercurialis perennis, Lamium galeobdolon, Anemone nemorosa and Primula elatior was lower in the acid Alnus soils than in the less acid Fraxinus soils. By contrast, the acid tolerant Convallaria majalis and Dryopteris dilatata were barely affected by tree species. Light conditions had less impact than soil chemistry and did not compensate for unfavourable soil conditions. Ca and P concentrations increased in plants grown in Fraxinus soils. TheMg and Al shoot/root ratios of respectively one and two of the acid tolerant species was elevated in the most acid soil. Conclusions: Tree species effects on forest perennials are mainly explained by increased Al concentrations under acidifying species. Changed plant concentrations and allocation are likely associated to Al antagonism. We found no light compensation for the soil effect on the studied species. However, light alters the plant nutrient concentrations and allocation which may suggest an indirect effect.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
Plant nutrient concentrations, Overstory-understory interactions, Al toxicity, Soil acidification Ecological compensation, Post-agricultural forest, WITH-STANDARDS FOREST, PAST LAND-USE, LEAF-LITTER, HERBACEOUS VEGETATION, RELATIVE IMPORTANCE, PLANTS, DIVERSITY, PHOSPHORUS, TEMPERATE, NUTRITION
journal title
PLANT AND SOIL
Plant Soil
volume
373
issue
1-2
pages
183 - 199
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000327400400013
JCR category
AGRONOMY
JCR impact factor
3.235 (2013)
JCR rank
5/79 (2013)
JCR quartile
1 (2013)
ISSN
0032-079X
DOI
10.1007/s11104-013-1786-x
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
4127697
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-4127697
date created
2013-09-06 10:03:36
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:43:40
@article{4127697,
  abstract     = {Aims: Tree species affect herb layer species through their effects on soil quality and light regime but their relative importance and interactions are insufficiently known.
Methods: Pot experiment with soil taken from stands planted with tree species with contrasting effects on soil acidification, two light regimes and six forest perennials.
Results: The survival or growth of Mercurialis perennis, Lamium galeobdolon, Anemone nemorosa and Primula elatior was lower in the acid Alnus soils than in the less acid Fraxinus soils. By contrast, the acid tolerant Convallaria majalis and Dryopteris dilatata were barely affected by tree species. Light conditions had less impact than soil chemistry and did not compensate for unfavourable soil conditions. Ca and P concentrations increased in plants grown in Fraxinus soils. TheMg and Al shoot/root ratios of respectively one and two of the acid tolerant species was elevated in the most acid soil.
Conclusions: Tree species effects on forest perennials are mainly explained by increased Al concentrations under acidifying species. Changed plant concentrations and allocation are likely associated to Al antagonism. We found no light compensation for the soil effect on the studied species. However, light alters the plant nutrient concentrations and allocation which may suggest an indirect effect.},
  author       = {Thomaes, Arno and De Keersmaeker, Luc and De Schrijver, An and Baeten, Lander and Vandekerkhove, Kris and Verstraeten, Gorik and Verheyen, Kris},
  issn         = {0032-079X},
  journal      = {PLANT AND SOIL},
  keyword      = {Plant nutrient concentrations,Overstory-understory interactions,Al toxicity,Soil acidification Ecological compensation,Post-agricultural forest,WITH-STANDARDS FOREST,PAST LAND-USE,LEAF-LITTER,HERBACEOUS VEGETATION,RELATIVE IMPORTANCE,PLANTS,DIVERSITY,PHOSPHORUS,TEMPERATE,NUTRITION},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1-2},
  pages        = {183--199},
  title        = {Can soil acidity and light help to explain tree species effects on forest herb layer performance in post-agricultural forests?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11104-013-1786-x},
  volume       = {373},
  year         = {2013},
}

Chicago
Thomaes, Arno, Luc De Keersmaeker, An De Schrijver, Lander Baeten, Kris Vandekerkhove, Gorik Verstraeten, and Kris Verheyen. 2013. “Can Soil Acidity and Light Help to Explain Tree Species Effects on Forest Herb Layer Performance in Post-agricultural Forests?” Plant and Soil 373 (1-2): 183–199.
APA
Thomaes, A., De Keersmaeker, L., De Schrijver, A., Baeten, L., Vandekerkhove, K., Verstraeten, G., & Verheyen, K. (2013). Can soil acidity and light help to explain tree species effects on forest herb layer performance in post-agricultural forests? PLANT AND SOIL, 373(1-2), 183–199.
Vancouver
1.
Thomaes A, De Keersmaeker L, De Schrijver A, Baeten L, Vandekerkhove K, Verstraeten G, et al. Can soil acidity and light help to explain tree species effects on forest herb layer performance in post-agricultural forests? PLANT AND SOIL. 2013;373(1-2):183–99.
MLA
Thomaes, Arno, Luc De Keersmaeker, An De Schrijver, et al. “Can Soil Acidity and Light Help to Explain Tree Species Effects on Forest Herb Layer Performance in Post-agricultural Forests?” PLANT AND SOIL 373.1-2 (2013): 183–199. Print.