Advanced search
1 file | 276.46 KB Add to list

Clinical efficacy of florfenicol administered in the drinking water against Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale in turkeys housed in different environmental conditions: a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic approach

Anneleen Watteyn (UGent) , Elisa Russo, An Garmyn (UGent) , Siegrid De Baere (UGent) , Frank Pasmans (UGent) , An Martel (UGent) , Freddy Haesebrouck (UGent) , Clara Montesissa, Patrick De Backer (UGent) and Siska Croubels (UGent)
(2013) AVIAN PATHOLOGY. 42(5). p.474-481
Author
Organization
Abstract
In poultry rearing, medicated drinking water is a commonly used administration route, but drug uptake can be affected by many factors. In this study, the influence of two important parameters, the photoperiod and feeding schemes, on florfenicol uptake in turkeys was tested. First, the uptake was determined as the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile of florfenicol; and second, we evaluated the clinical efficacy of florfenicol against Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale. Both experiments were conducted during a 5-day treatment of 30 mg/kg body weight florfenicol administered via drinking water and considering different photoperiods and feeding schemes (group 20/4L: photoperiod of 20 h, fed ad libitum; group 16/8L: photoperiod of 16 h, fed ad libitum; group 16/8R: photoperiod of 16 h, fed ad libitum but feed was withdrawn during the dark period and replaced 1 h after lighting). On day 1 of treatment, all groups showed plasma concentrations above the minimum inhibitory concentration (both MIC50 and MIC90, 1 mg/l) of 37.7%, 63.5% and 53.1% of a 24-h interval for 20/4L, 16/8L and 16/8R, respectively. Only in the 16/8L and 16/8R groups was the MIC also exceeded on day 5 (47.9% and 21.5% of a 24-h interval, respectively). In all groups, a clinical improvement could be noticed, resulting in reduction of the clinical score. However, only the 16/8L and 16/8R groups showed significant differences from the control group. The results demonstrated an important influence of the photoperiod on the pharmacokinetics of florfenicol as well as the clinical outcome in an infection model. It can be advised that the photoperiod should be <20 h to have sufficient drug intake. Nevertheless, there was no effect between fed and fasted turkeys for both the pharmacokinetics and the clinical outcome.
Keywords
RESPIRATORY-DISEASE, AVIAN PNEUMOVIRUS, BROILER-CHICKENS, ANTIBIOTIC-SENSITIVITY, TISSUE DEPLETION, PHARMACOKINETICS, INFECTION, ENROFLOXACIN, BEHAVIOR, STRAINS

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 276.46 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Watteyn, Anneleen, Elisa Russo, An Garmyn, et al. “Clinical Efficacy of Florfenicol Administered in the Drinking Water Against Ornithobacterium Rhinotracheale in Turkeys Housed in Different Environmental Conditions: a Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic Approach.” AVIAN PATHOLOGY 42.5 (2013): 474–481. Print.
APA
Watteyn, A., Russo, E., Garmyn, A., De Baere, S., Pasmans, F., Martel, A., Haesebrouck, F., et al. (2013). Clinical efficacy of florfenicol administered in the drinking water against Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale in turkeys housed in different environmental conditions: a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic approach. AVIAN PATHOLOGY, 42(5), 474–481.
Chicago author-date
Watteyn, Anneleen, Elisa Russo, An Garmyn, Siegrid De Baere, Frank Pasmans, An Martel, Freddy Haesebrouck, Clara Montesissa, Patrick De Backer, and Siska Croubels. 2013. “Clinical Efficacy of Florfenicol Administered in the Drinking Water Against Ornithobacterium Rhinotracheale in Turkeys Housed in Different Environmental Conditions: a Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic Approach.” Avian Pathology 42 (5): 474–481.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Watteyn, Anneleen, Elisa Russo, An Garmyn, Siegrid De Baere, Frank Pasmans, An Martel, Freddy Haesebrouck, Clara Montesissa, Patrick De Backer, and Siska Croubels. 2013. “Clinical Efficacy of Florfenicol Administered in the Drinking Water Against Ornithobacterium Rhinotracheale in Turkeys Housed in Different Environmental Conditions: a Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic Approach.” Avian Pathology 42 (5): 474–481.
Vancouver
1.
Watteyn A, Russo E, Garmyn A, De Baere S, Pasmans F, Martel A, et al. Clinical efficacy of florfenicol administered in the drinking water against Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale in turkeys housed in different environmental conditions: a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic approach. AVIAN PATHOLOGY. 2013;42(5):474–81.
IEEE
[1]
A. Watteyn et al., “Clinical efficacy of florfenicol administered in the drinking water against Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale in turkeys housed in different environmental conditions: a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic approach,” AVIAN PATHOLOGY, vol. 42, no. 5, pp. 474–481, 2013.
@article{4122835,
  abstract     = {In poultry rearing, medicated drinking water is a commonly used administration route, but drug uptake can be affected by many factors. In this study, the influence of two important parameters, the photoperiod and feeding schemes, on florfenicol uptake in turkeys was tested. First, the uptake was determined as the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile of florfenicol; and second, we evaluated the clinical efficacy of florfenicol against Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale. Both experiments were conducted during a 5-day treatment of 30 mg/kg body weight florfenicol administered via drinking water and considering different photoperiods and feeding schemes (group 20/4L: photoperiod of 20 h, fed ad libitum; group 16/8L: photoperiod of 16 h, fed ad libitum; group 16/8R: photoperiod of 16 h, fed ad libitum but feed was withdrawn during the dark period and replaced 1 h after lighting). On day 1 of treatment, all groups showed plasma concentrations above the minimum inhibitory concentration (both MIC50 and MIC90, 1 mg/l) of 37.7%, 63.5% and 53.1% of a 24-h interval for 20/4L, 16/8L and 16/8R, respectively. Only in the 16/8L and 16/8R groups was the MIC also exceeded on day 5 (47.9% and 21.5% of a 24-h interval, respectively). In all groups, a clinical improvement could be noticed, resulting in reduction of the clinical score. However, only the 16/8L and 16/8R groups showed significant differences from the control group. The results demonstrated an important influence of the photoperiod on the pharmacokinetics of florfenicol as well as the clinical outcome in an infection model. It can be advised that the photoperiod should be <20 h to have sufficient drug intake. Nevertheless, there was no effect between fed and fasted turkeys for both the pharmacokinetics and the clinical outcome.},
  author       = {Watteyn, Anneleen and Russo, Elisa and Garmyn, An and De Baere, Siegrid and Pasmans, Frank and Martel, An and Haesebrouck, Freddy and Montesissa, Clara and De Backer, Patrick and Croubels, Siska},
  issn         = {0307-9457},
  journal      = {AVIAN PATHOLOGY},
  keywords     = {RESPIRATORY-DISEASE,AVIAN PNEUMOVIRUS,BROILER-CHICKENS,ANTIBIOTIC-SENSITIVITY,TISSUE DEPLETION,PHARMACOKINETICS,INFECTION,ENROFLOXACIN,BEHAVIOR,STRAINS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {474--481},
  title        = {Clinical efficacy of florfenicol administered in the drinking water against Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale in turkeys housed in different environmental conditions: a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic approach},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03079457.2013.823144},
  volume       = {42},
  year         = {2013},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: