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Prevalence of lameness and claw lesions during different stages in the reproductive cycle of sows and the impact on reproduction results

(2013) ANIMAL. 7(7). p.1174-1181
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Abstract
Lameness in sows is an emerging disease condition with major effects on animal welfare and economics. Yet the direct impact on reproduction results remains unclear. The present field study investigated the impact of lameness and claw lesions throughout the reproductive cycle on (re)production results of sows. In five farms, a total of 491 group-housed sows were followed up for a period of one reproductive cycle. Sows were assessed for lameness every time they were moved to another area in the farm. Claw lesions were scored at the beginning and at the end of the cycle. Reproduction results included the number of live-born piglets, stillborn piglets, mummified fetuses and crushed piglets, weaning-to-oestrus interval and the presence of sows not showing oestrus post weaning, returning to service and aborting. Sows that left the group were recorded and the reason was noted. A mean prevalence of lameness of 5.9% was found, although it depended on the time in the productive cycle. The highest percentage of lame sows (8.1%) was found when sows were moved from the post-weaning to the gestation stable. No significant associations were found between lameness and reproduction parameters with the exception of the effect on mummified foetuses. Wall cracks, white line lesions, heel lesions and skin lesions did have an effect on farrowing performance. Of all sows, 22% left the group throughout the study, and almost half of these sows were removed from the farm. Lameness was the second most important reason for culling. Sows culled because of lameness were significantly younger compared with sows culled for other reasons (parity: 2.6 +/- 1.3 v. 4.0 +/- 1.8). In conclusion, the present results indicate that lameness mainly affects farm productivity indirectly through its effect on sow longevity whereas claw lesions directly affect some reproductive parameters. The high percentage of lame sows in the insemination stable indicate that risk factor studies should not only focus on the gestation stable, but also on housing conditions in the insemination stable.
Keywords
lameness, sow, reproduction, culling, claw lesions, GROUP-HOUSING SYSTEMS, GROUP-HOUSED SOWS, PREGNANT SOWS, GESTATING SOWS, LACTATING SOWS, BODY CONDITION, WELFARE, STALLS, LOOSE, HERDS

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Citation

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MLA
Pluym, Liesbet et al. “Prevalence of Lameness and Claw Lesions During Different Stages in the Reproductive Cycle of Sows and the Impact on Reproduction Results.” ANIMAL 7.7 (2013): 1174–1181. Print.
APA
Pluym, L., Van Nuffel, A., Van Weyenberg, S., & Maes, D. (2013). Prevalence of lameness and claw lesions during different stages in the reproductive cycle of sows and the impact on reproduction results. ANIMAL, 7(7), 1174–1181.
Chicago author-date
Pluym, Liesbet, A Van Nuffel, S Van Weyenberg, and Dominiek Maes. 2013. “Prevalence of Lameness and Claw Lesions During Different Stages in the Reproductive Cycle of Sows and the Impact on Reproduction Results.” Animal 7 (7): 1174–1181.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Pluym, Liesbet, A Van Nuffel, S Van Weyenberg, and Dominiek Maes. 2013. “Prevalence of Lameness and Claw Lesions During Different Stages in the Reproductive Cycle of Sows and the Impact on Reproduction Results.” Animal 7 (7): 1174–1181.
Vancouver
1.
Pluym L, Van Nuffel A, Van Weyenberg S, Maes D. Prevalence of lameness and claw lesions during different stages in the reproductive cycle of sows and the impact on reproduction results. ANIMAL. 2013;7(7):1174–81.
IEEE
[1]
L. Pluym, A. Van Nuffel, S. Van Weyenberg, and D. Maes, “Prevalence of lameness and claw lesions during different stages in the reproductive cycle of sows and the impact on reproduction results,” ANIMAL, vol. 7, no. 7, pp. 1174–1181, 2013.
@article{4117620,
  abstract     = {Lameness in sows is an emerging disease condition with major effects on animal welfare and economics. Yet the direct impact on reproduction results remains unclear. The present field study investigated the impact of lameness and claw lesions throughout the reproductive cycle on (re)production results of sows. In five farms, a total of 491 group-housed sows were followed up for a period of one reproductive cycle. Sows were assessed for lameness every time they were moved to another area in the farm. Claw lesions were scored at the beginning and at the end of the cycle. Reproduction results included the number of live-born piglets, stillborn piglets, mummified fetuses and crushed piglets, weaning-to-oestrus interval and the presence of sows not showing oestrus post weaning, returning to service and aborting. Sows that left the group were recorded and the reason was noted. A mean prevalence of lameness of 5.9% was found, although it depended on the time in the productive cycle. The highest percentage of lame sows (8.1%) was found when sows were moved from the post-weaning to the gestation stable. No significant associations were found between lameness and reproduction parameters with the exception of the effect on mummified foetuses. Wall cracks, white line lesions, heel lesions and skin lesions did have an effect on farrowing performance. Of all sows, 22% left the group throughout the study, and almost half of these sows were removed from the farm. Lameness was the second most important reason for culling. Sows culled because of lameness were significantly younger compared with sows culled for other reasons (parity: 2.6 +/- 1.3 v. 4.0 +/- 1.8). In conclusion, the present results indicate that lameness mainly affects farm productivity indirectly through its effect on sow longevity whereas claw lesions directly affect some reproductive parameters. The high percentage of lame sows in the insemination stable indicate that risk factor studies should not only focus on the gestation stable, but also on housing conditions in the insemination stable.},
  author       = {Pluym, Liesbet and Van Nuffel, A and Van Weyenberg, S and Maes, Dominiek},
  issn         = {1751-7311},
  journal      = {ANIMAL},
  keywords     = {lameness,sow,reproduction,culling,claw lesions,GROUP-HOUSING SYSTEMS,GROUP-HOUSED SOWS,PREGNANT SOWS,GESTATING SOWS,LACTATING SOWS,BODY CONDITION,WELFARE,STALLS,LOOSE,HERDS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {1174--1181},
  title        = {Prevalence of lameness and claw lesions during different stages in the reproductive cycle of sows and the impact on reproduction results},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1751731113000232},
  volume       = {7},
  year         = {2013},
}

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