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Use of primary cultures of Kenyon cells from bumblebee brains to assess pesticide side effects

Daniel E Wilson, Rodrigo A Velarde, Susan E Fahrbach, Veerle Mommaerts UGent and Guy Smagghe UGent (2013) ARCHIVES OF INSECT BIOCHEMISTRY AND PHYSIOLOGY. 84(1). p.43-56
abstract
Bumblebees are important pollinators in natural and agricultural ecosystems. The latter results in the frequent exposure of bumblebees to pesticides. We report here on a new bioassay that uses primary cultures of neurons derived from adult bumblebee workers to evaluate possible side-effects of the neonicotinoid pesticide imidacloprid. Mushroom bodies (MBs) from the brains of bumblebee workers were dissected and dissociated to produce cultures of Kenyon cells (KCs). Cultured KCs typically extend branched, dendrite-like processes called neurites, with substantial growth evident 24-48 h after culture initiation. Exposure of cultured KCs obtained from newly eclosed adult workers to 2.5 parts per billion (ppb) imidacloprid, an environmentally relevant concentration of pesticide, did not have a detectable effect on neurite outgrowth. By contrast, in cultures prepared from newly eclosed adult bumblebees, inhibitory effects of imidacloprid were evident when the medium contained 25 ppb imidacloprid, and no growth was observed at 2,500 ppb. The KCs of older workers (13-day-old nurses and foragers) appeared to be more sensitive to imidacloprid than newly eclosed adults, as strong effects on KCs obtained from older nurses and foragers were also evident at 2.5 ppb imidacloprid. In conclusion, primary cultures using KCs of bumblebee worker brains offer a tool to assess sublethal effects of neurotoxic pesticides in vitro. Such studies also have the potential to contribute to the understanding of mechanisms of plasticity in the adult bumblebee brain.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
EXPERIENCE, DROSOPHILA, IONIC CURRENTS, BEE, NEUROANATOMICAL PLASTICITY, LEARNING PERFORMANCES, MUSHROOM BODY, ANTENNAL LOBE NEURONS, HONEYBEES APIS-MELLIFERA, NICOTINIC ACETYLCHOLINE-RECEPTOR, neurite, Kenyon cells, neonicotinoids, imidacloprid
journal title
ARCHIVES OF INSECT BIOCHEMISTRY AND PHYSIOLOGY
Arch. Insect Biochem. Physiol.
volume
84
issue
1
pages
43 - 56
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000322910900005
JCR category
ENTOMOLOGY
JCR impact factor
1.16 (2013)
JCR rank
35/90 (2013)
JCR quartile
2 (2013)
ISSN
0739-4462
DOI
10.1002/arch.21112
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
4115910
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-4115910
date created
2013-08-14 14:53:04
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:46:04
@article{4115910,
  abstract     = {Bumblebees are important pollinators in natural and agricultural ecosystems. The latter results in the frequent exposure of bumblebees to pesticides. We report here on a new bioassay that uses primary cultures of neurons derived from adult bumblebee workers to evaluate possible side-effects of the neonicotinoid pesticide imidacloprid. Mushroom bodies (MBs) from the brains of bumblebee workers were dissected and dissociated to produce cultures of Kenyon cells (KCs). Cultured KCs typically extend branched, dendrite-like processes called neurites, with substantial growth evident 24-48 h after culture initiation. Exposure of cultured KCs obtained from newly eclosed adult workers to 2.5 parts per billion (ppb) imidacloprid, an environmentally relevant concentration of pesticide, did not have a detectable effect on neurite outgrowth. By contrast, in cultures prepared from newly eclosed adult bumblebees, inhibitory effects of imidacloprid were evident when the medium contained 25 ppb imidacloprid, and no growth was observed at 2,500 ppb. The KCs of older workers (13-day-old nurses and foragers) appeared to be more sensitive to imidacloprid than newly eclosed adults, as strong effects on KCs obtained from older nurses and foragers were also evident at 2.5 ppb imidacloprid. In conclusion, primary cultures using KCs of bumblebee worker brains offer a tool to assess sublethal effects of neurotoxic pesticides in vitro. Such studies also have the potential to contribute to the understanding of mechanisms of plasticity in the adult bumblebee brain.},
  author       = {Wilson, Daniel E and Velarde, Rodrigo A and Fahrbach, Susan E and Mommaerts, Veerle and Smagghe, Guy},
  issn         = {0739-4462},
  journal      = {ARCHIVES OF INSECT BIOCHEMISTRY AND PHYSIOLOGY},
  keyword      = {EXPERIENCE,DROSOPHILA,IONIC CURRENTS,BEE,NEUROANATOMICAL PLASTICITY,LEARNING PERFORMANCES,MUSHROOM BODY,ANTENNAL LOBE NEURONS,HONEYBEES APIS-MELLIFERA,NICOTINIC ACETYLCHOLINE-RECEPTOR,neurite,Kenyon cells,neonicotinoids,imidacloprid},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {43--56},
  title        = {Use of primary cultures of Kenyon cells from bumblebee brains to assess pesticide side effects},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/arch.21112},
  volume       = {84},
  year         = {2013},
}

Chicago
Wilson, Daniel E, Rodrigo A Velarde, Susan E Fahrbach, Veerle Mommaerts, and Guy Smagghe. 2013. “Use of Primary Cultures of Kenyon Cells from Bumblebee Brains to Assess Pesticide Side Effects.” Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology 84 (1): 43–56.
APA
Wilson, D. E., Velarde, R. A., Fahrbach, S. E., Mommaerts, V., & Smagghe, G. (2013). Use of primary cultures of Kenyon cells from bumblebee brains to assess pesticide side effects. ARCHIVES OF INSECT BIOCHEMISTRY AND PHYSIOLOGY, 84(1), 43–56.
Vancouver
1.
Wilson DE, Velarde RA, Fahrbach SE, Mommaerts V, Smagghe G. Use of primary cultures of Kenyon cells from bumblebee brains to assess pesticide side effects. ARCHIVES OF INSECT BIOCHEMISTRY AND PHYSIOLOGY. 2013;84(1):43–56.
MLA
Wilson, Daniel E, Rodrigo A Velarde, Susan E Fahrbach, et al. “Use of Primary Cultures of Kenyon Cells from Bumblebee Brains to Assess Pesticide Side Effects.” ARCHIVES OF INSECT BIOCHEMISTRY AND PHYSIOLOGY 84.1 (2013): 43–56. Print.