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Digestate management in Flanders: nutrient removal versus nutrient recovery

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Abstract
Intensive livestock production combined with limited availability of land for manure disposal and fertilisation restrictions by the EU-legislation make Flanders (Belgium) a 100% Nitrate Vulnerable Zone. The Flemish Manure Decree has been implemented in order to take measures against nitrate and phosphate pollution in water, resulting from the produced nutrient excess. From the 39 anaerobic digestion plants operational in Flanders, most of the installations are co-digestion plants that process an input mixture of animal manure, organic waste streams and energy crops. According to the Manure Decree however, digestate from co-digestion plants that take in manure also has the status of animal manure, and application on arable land is limited by the 170 kg N/ha/y restriction. For this reason, digestate from anaerobic digestion plants competes with manure for nutrient disposal on arable land, which forms a serious hinder for the biogas sector to develop in these regions. Hence, one of the biggest challenges for anaerobic digestion plants in a region like Flanders, is to find cost-effective and sustainable ways for digestate processing or disposal. In the framework of the ongoing Interreg NWE project ARBOR, VCM, Ghent University and Inagro investigate the options for nutrient recovery from digestate. This paper gives an overview, both of the currently applied techniques for digestate processing in Flanders, as well as the techniques that enable nutrient recovery from digestate. It also focuses on the physicochemical characteristics of the end-products, and the potential constraints for successful valorisation.
Keywords
nutrient recovery, Digestate processing

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Chicago
Lebuf, Viooltje, Sara Vanelsacker, Frederik Accoe, Céline Vaneeckhaute, Erik Meers, and Evi Michels. 2013. “Digestate Management in Flanders: Nutrient Removal Versus Nutrient Recovery.” In International Anaerobic Digestion Symposium at BioGasWorld, Proceedings. Berlin, Germany: IBBK Fachgruppe Biogas.
APA
Lebuf, V., Vanelsacker, S., Accoe, F., Vaneeckhaute, C., Meers, E., & Michels, E. (2013). Digestate management in Flanders: nutrient removal versus nutrient recovery. International Anaerobic Digestion Symposium at BioGasWorld, Proceedings. Presented at the International Anaerobic Digestion Symposium at BioGasWorld 2013, Berlin, Germany: IBBK Fachgruppe Biogas.
Vancouver
1.
Lebuf V, Vanelsacker S, Accoe F, Vaneeckhaute C, Meers E, Michels E. Digestate management in Flanders: nutrient removal versus nutrient recovery. International Anaerobic Digestion Symposium at BioGasWorld, Proceedings. Berlin, Germany: IBBK Fachgruppe Biogas; 2013.
MLA
Lebuf, Viooltje et al. “Digestate Management in Flanders: Nutrient Removal Versus Nutrient Recovery.” International Anaerobic Digestion Symposium at BioGasWorld, Proceedings. Berlin, Germany: IBBK Fachgruppe Biogas, 2013. Print.
@inproceedings{4115300,
  abstract     = {Intensive livestock production combined with limited availability of land for manure disposal and fertilisation restrictions by the EU-legislation make Flanders (Belgium) a 100\% Nitrate Vulnerable Zone. The Flemish Manure Decree has been implemented in order to take measures against nitrate and phosphate pollution in water, resulting from the produced nutrient excess.
From the 39 anaerobic digestion plants operational in Flanders, most of the installations are co-digestion plants that process an input mixture of animal manure, organic waste streams and energy crops. According to the Manure Decree however, digestate from co-digestion plants that take in manure also has the status of animal manure, and application on arable land is limited by the 170 kg N/ha/y restriction. For this reason, digestate from anaerobic digestion plants competes with manure for nutrient disposal on arable land, which forms a serious hinder for the biogas sector to develop in these regions.
Hence, one of the biggest challenges for anaerobic digestion plants in a region like Flanders, is to find cost-effective and sustainable ways for digestate processing or disposal. 
In the framework of the ongoing Interreg NWE project ARBOR, VCM, Ghent University and Inagro investigate the options for nutrient recovery from digestate. This paper gives an overview, both of the currently applied techniques for digestate processing in Flanders, as well as the techniques that enable nutrient recovery from digestate. It also focuses on the physicochemical characteristics of the end-products, and the potential constraints for successful valorisation.},
  author       = {Lebuf, Viooltje and Vanelsacker, Sara and Accoe, Frederik and Vaneeckhaute, C{\'e}line and Meers, Erik and Michels, Evi},
  booktitle    = {International Anaerobic Digestion Symposium at BioGasWorld, Proceedings},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Berlin, Germany},
  pages        = {8},
  publisher    = {IBBK Fachgruppe Biogas},
  title        = {Digestate management in Flanders: nutrient removal versus nutrient recovery},
  year         = {2013},
}