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Ectopic expression of Kip-related proteins restrains root-knot nematode-feeding site expansion

(2013) NEW PHYTOLOGIST. 199(2). p.505-519
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Abstract
The development of nematode feeding sites induced by root-knot nematodes involves the synchronized activation of cell cycle processes such as acytokinetic mitoses and DNA amplification. A number of key cell cycle genes are reported to be critical for nematode feeding site development. However, it remains unknown whether plant cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors such as the Arabidopsis interactor/inhibitor of CDK (ICK)/Kip-related protein (KRP) family are involved in nematode feeding site development. This study demonstrates the involvement of Arabidopsis ICK2/KRP2 and ICK1/KRP1 in the control of mitosis to endoreduplication in galls induced by the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita. Using ICK/KRP promoter-GUS fusions and mRNA in situ hybridizations, we showed that ICK2/KRP2, ICK3/KRP5 and ICK4/KRP6 are expressed in galls after nematode infection. Loss-of-function mutants have minor effects on gall development and nematode reproduction. Conversely, overexpression of both ICK1/KRP1 and ICK2/KRP2 impaired mitosis in giant cells and blocked neighboring cell proliferation, resulting in a drastic reduction of gall size. Studying the dynamics of protein expression demonstrated that protein levels of ICK2/KRP2 are tightly regulated during giant cell development and reliant on the presence of the nematode. This work demonstrates that impeding cell cycle progression by means of ICK1/KRP1 and ICK2/KRP2 overexpression severely restricts gall development, leading to a marked limitation of root-knot nematode development and reduced numbers of offspring.
Keywords
CELL-CYCLE, CDK INHIBITORS, GENE-EXPRESSION, ENDOREDUPLICATION, LOCALIZATION, COMPLEX, PLANTS, PROLIFERATION, ARABIDOPSIS-THALIANA, DEPENDENT KINASE INHIBITORS, nuclei, Meloidogyne, giant cells, Arabidopsis roots, cell cycle

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Citation

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MLA
Vieira, Paulo, Carmen Escudero, Natalia Rodiuc, et al. “Ectopic Expression of Kip-related Proteins Restrains Root-knot Nematode-feeding Site Expansion.” NEW PHYTOLOGIST 199.2 (2013): 505–519. Print.
APA
Vieira, Paulo, Escudero, C., Rodiuc, N., Boruc, J., Russinova, E., Glab, N., Mota, M., et al. (2013). Ectopic expression of Kip-related proteins restrains root-knot nematode-feeding site expansion. NEW PHYTOLOGIST, 199(2), 505–519.
Chicago author-date
Vieira, Paulo, Carmen Escudero, Natalia Rodiuc, Joanna Boruc, Eugenia Russinova, Nathalie Glab, Manuel Mota, et al. 2013. “Ectopic Expression of Kip-related Proteins Restrains Root-knot Nematode-feeding Site Expansion.” New Phytologist 199 (2): 505–519.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Vieira, Paulo, Carmen Escudero, Natalia Rodiuc, Joanna Boruc, Eugenia Russinova, Nathalie Glab, Manuel Mota, Lieven De Veylder, Pierre Abad, Gilbert Engler, and Janice de Almeida Engler. 2013. “Ectopic Expression of Kip-related Proteins Restrains Root-knot Nematode-feeding Site Expansion.” New Phytologist 199 (2): 505–519.
Vancouver
1.
Vieira P, Escudero C, Rodiuc N, Boruc J, Russinova E, Glab N, et al. Ectopic expression of Kip-related proteins restrains root-knot nematode-feeding site expansion. NEW PHYTOLOGIST. 2013;199(2):505–19.
IEEE
[1]
P. Vieira et al., “Ectopic expression of Kip-related proteins restrains root-knot nematode-feeding site expansion,” NEW PHYTOLOGIST, vol. 199, no. 2, pp. 505–519, 2013.
@article{4110313,
  abstract     = {The development of nematode feeding sites induced by root-knot nematodes involves the synchronized activation of cell cycle processes such as acytokinetic mitoses and DNA amplification. A number of key cell cycle genes are reported to be critical for nematode feeding site development. However, it remains unknown whether plant cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors such as the Arabidopsis interactor/inhibitor of CDK (ICK)/Kip-related protein (KRP) family are involved in nematode feeding site development. This study demonstrates the involvement of Arabidopsis ICK2/KRP2 and ICK1/KRP1 in the control of mitosis to endoreduplication in galls induced by the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita. Using ICK/KRP promoter-GUS fusions and mRNA in situ hybridizations, we showed that ICK2/KRP2, ICK3/KRP5 and ICK4/KRP6 are expressed in galls after nematode infection. Loss-of-function mutants have minor effects on gall development and nematode reproduction. Conversely, overexpression of both ICK1/KRP1 and ICK2/KRP2 impaired mitosis in giant cells and blocked neighboring cell proliferation, resulting in a drastic reduction of gall size. Studying the dynamics of protein expression demonstrated that protein levels of ICK2/KRP2 are tightly regulated during giant cell development and reliant on the presence of the nematode. This work demonstrates that impeding cell cycle progression by means of ICK1/KRP1 and ICK2/KRP2 overexpression severely restricts gall development, leading to a marked limitation of root-knot nematode development and reduced numbers of offspring.},
  author       = {Vieira, Paulo and Escudero, Carmen and Rodiuc, Natalia and Boruc, Joanna and Russinova, Eugenia and Glab, Nathalie and Mota, Manuel and De Veylder, Lieven and Abad, Pierre and Engler, Gilbert and de Almeida Engler, Janice},
  issn         = {0028-646X},
  journal      = {NEW PHYTOLOGIST},
  keywords     = {CELL-CYCLE,CDK INHIBITORS,GENE-EXPRESSION,ENDOREDUPLICATION,LOCALIZATION,COMPLEX,PLANTS,PROLIFERATION,ARABIDOPSIS-THALIANA,DEPENDENT KINASE INHIBITORS,nuclei,Meloidogyne,giant cells,Arabidopsis roots,cell cycle},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {505--519},
  title        = {Ectopic expression of Kip-related proteins restrains root-knot nematode-feeding site expansion},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/nph.12255},
  volume       = {199},
  year         = {2013},
}

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