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Travel and subjective well-being: a focus on findings, methods and future research needs

(2013) TRANSPORT REVIEWS. 33(4). p.421-442
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Abstract
Subjectively experienced well-being has recently attracted increased attention in transport and mobility studies. However, these studies are still in their infancy and many of the multifarious links between travel behaviour and well-being are still under-examined; most studies only focus on one aspect of this link (i.e. travel satisfaction). In this paper, we give an overview of studies concerning travel and well-being, focusing on results, methods and gaps in present research. We suggest that travel behaviour affects well-being through experiences during (destination-oriented) travel, activity participation enabled by travel, activities during (destination-oriented) travel, trips where travel is the activity and through potential travel (or motility). The majority of empirical studies to date have been based on hedonic views of well-being, where pleasure and satisfaction are seen as the ultimate goal in life. They have paid little attention to eudaimonic views of well-being, which emphasise the realisation of one’s true potential, although this form of well-being can also be influenced by travel behaviour. We also argue that longer-term decisions, such as residential location choices, can affect well-being through travel. Travel options differ between different kinds of neighbourhoods, which can result in different levels of (feelings of) freedom and consequently different levels of subjective well-being. Since studies at present only show a subset of the travel behaviour–well-being interactions, we conclude the paper with an agenda for future research.
Keywords
travel behaviour, well-being, travel satisfaction, activities, potential travel, residential location choice, SELF-REPORT MEASURE, SOCIAL EXCLUSION, PUBLIC TRANSPORT, CORE AFFECT, LATER LIFE, TOP-DOWN, MOBILITY, HAPPINESS, SATISFACTION, ENVIRONMENT

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
De Vos, Jonas et al. “Travel and Subjective Well-being: a Focus on Findings, Methods and Future Research Needs.” TRANSPORT REVIEWS 33.4 (2013): 421–442. Print.
APA
De Vos, Jonas, Schwanen, T., Van Acker, V., & Witlox, F. (2013). Travel and subjective well-being: a focus on findings, methods and future research needs. TRANSPORT REVIEWS, 33(4), 421–442.
Chicago author-date
De Vos, Jonas, Tim Schwanen, Veronique Van Acker, and Frank Witlox. 2013. “Travel and Subjective Well-being: a Focus on Findings, Methods and Future Research Needs.” Transport Reviews 33 (4): 421–442.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
De Vos, Jonas, Tim Schwanen, Veronique Van Acker, and Frank Witlox. 2013. “Travel and Subjective Well-being: a Focus on Findings, Methods and Future Research Needs.” Transport Reviews 33 (4): 421–442.
Vancouver
1.
De Vos J, Schwanen T, Van Acker V, Witlox F. Travel and subjective well-being: a focus on findings, methods and future research needs. TRANSPORT REVIEWS. 2013;33(4):421–42.
IEEE
[1]
J. De Vos, T. Schwanen, V. Van Acker, and F. Witlox, “Travel and subjective well-being: a focus on findings, methods and future research needs,” TRANSPORT REVIEWS, vol. 33, no. 4, pp. 421–442, 2013.
@article{4107770,
  abstract     = {Subjectively experienced well-being has recently attracted increased attention in transport and mobility studies. However, these studies are still in their infancy and many of the multifarious links between travel behaviour and well-being are still under-examined; most studies only focus on one aspect of this link (i.e. travel satisfaction). In this paper, we give an overview of studies concerning travel and well-being, focusing on results, methods and gaps in present research. We suggest that travel behaviour affects well-being through experiences during (destination-oriented) travel, activity participation enabled by travel, activities during (destination-oriented) travel, trips where travel is the activity and through potential travel (or motility). The majority of empirical studies to date have been based on hedonic views of well-being, where pleasure and satisfaction are seen as the ultimate goal in life. They have paid little attention to eudaimonic views of well-being, which emphasise the realisation of one’s true potential, although this form of well-being can also be influenced by travel behaviour. We also argue that longer-term decisions, such as residential location choices, can affect well-being through travel. Travel options differ between different kinds of neighbourhoods, which can result in different levels of (feelings of) freedom and consequently different levels of subjective well-being. Since studies at present only show a subset of the travel behaviour–well-being interactions, we conclude the paper with an agenda for future research.},
  author       = {De Vos, Jonas and Schwanen, Tim and Van Acker, Veronique and Witlox, Frank},
  issn         = {0144-1647},
  journal      = {TRANSPORT REVIEWS},
  keywords     = {travel behaviour,well-being,travel satisfaction,activities,potential travel,residential location choice,SELF-REPORT MEASURE,SOCIAL EXCLUSION,PUBLIC TRANSPORT,CORE AFFECT,LATER LIFE,TOP-DOWN,MOBILITY,HAPPINESS,SATISFACTION,ENVIRONMENT},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {421--442},
  title        = {Travel and subjective well-being: a focus on findings, methods and future research needs},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01441647.2013.815665},
  volume       = {33},
  year         = {2013},
}

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