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Dynamics of de novo formation of amino sugars in soil via compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSSIA) : a promising tool to assess microbial physiology?

Samuel Bodé (UGent) , Bai Zhen, Dries Huygens (UGent) , Xudong Zhang (UGent) and Pascal Boeckx (UGent)
Author
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Abstract
Amino sugars are the building blocks of microbial cell walls and have widely been used to asses microbial residues. To have a better insight in the formation dynamics of amino sugars in soil, uniformly 13C-labeled wheat residue of different quality (grain, leaf and root) was amended to two soils under distinct tillage managements. The isotopic composition of individual amino sugars was measured using liquid chromatography - isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC-IRMS). A maximum formation was reached within few days after residue addition. Glucosamine and galactosamine followed dissimilar formation kinetics. The maxima of incorporation of residue carbon into the amino sugars pools ranged from 1.0% of the amino sugar pool for galactosamine to 10.6% for glucosamine. Formation rate constants of residue derived amino sugars ranged from 0.11 to 0.48 day-1 for galactosamine and glucosamine, respectively. In general, larger amounts of amino sugars were formed at a higher rate with increasing plant residue quality. The microbial community of the no-till soil was better adapted to assimilate low quality plant residues (i.e. leaf and root). All together, the formation dynamics of microbial cell wall components was component-specific and determined by residue quality and soil microbial community.
Keywords
Amino sugars, LC-IRMS, 13C

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Chicago
Bodé, Samuel, Bai Zhen, Dries Huygens, Xudong Zhang, and Pascal Boeckx. 2012. “Dynamics of De Novo Formation of Amino Sugars in Soil via Compound-specific Stable Isotope Analysis (CSSIA) : a Promising Tool to Assess Microbial Physiology?” In Managing Soils for Food Security and Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation, FAO/IAEA International Symposium, Abstracts.
APA
Bodé, S., Zhen, B., Huygens, D., Zhang, X., & Boeckx, P. (2012). Dynamics of de novo formation of amino sugars in soil via compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSSIA) : a promising tool to assess microbial physiology? Managing Soils for Food Security and Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation, FAO/IAEA International symposium, Abstracts. Presented at the FAO/IAEA International symposium on Managing Soils for Food Security and Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation.
Vancouver
1.
Bodé S, Zhen B, Huygens D, Zhang X, Boeckx P. Dynamics of de novo formation of amino sugars in soil via compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSSIA) : a promising tool to assess microbial physiology? Managing Soils for Food Security and Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation, FAO/IAEA International symposium, Abstracts. 2012.
MLA
Bodé, Samuel, Bai Zhen, Dries Huygens, et al. “Dynamics of De Novo Formation of Amino Sugars in Soil via Compound-specific Stable Isotope Analysis (CSSIA) : a Promising Tool to Assess Microbial Physiology?” Managing Soils for Food Security and Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation, FAO/IAEA International Symposium, Abstracts. 2012. Print.
@inproceedings{4098641,
  abstract     = {Amino sugars are the building blocks of microbial cell walls and have widely been used to asses microbial residues. To have a better insight in the formation dynamics of amino sugars in soil, uniformly 13C-labeled wheat residue of different quality (grain, leaf and root) was amended to two soils under distinct tillage managements. The isotopic composition of individual amino sugars was measured using liquid chromatography - isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC-IRMS). A maximum formation was reached within few days after residue addition. Glucosamine and galactosamine followed dissimilar formation kinetics. The maxima of incorporation of residue carbon into the amino sugars pools ranged from 1.0\% of the amino sugar pool for galactosamine to 10.6\% for glucosamine. Formation rate constants of residue derived amino sugars ranged from 0.11 to 0.48 day-1 for  galactosamine and glucosamine, respectively. In general, larger amounts of amino sugars were formed at a higher rate with increasing plant residue quality. The microbial community of the no-till soil was better adapted to assimilate low quality plant residues (i.e. leaf and root). All together, the formation dynamics of microbial cell wall components was component-specific and determined by residue quality and soil microbial community.},
  author       = {Bod{\'e}, Samuel and Zhen, Bai and Huygens, Dries and Zhang, Xudong and Boeckx, Pascal},
  booktitle    = {Managing Soils for Food Security and Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation, FAO/IAEA International symposium, Abstracts},
  keyword      = {Amino sugars,LC-IRMS,13C},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Vienna, Austria},
  title        = {Dynamics of de novo formation of amino sugars in soil via compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSSIA) : a promising tool to assess microbial physiology?},
  year         = {2012},
}