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Evaluation of lung function in voluntary fire fighters: preliminary results

Author
Organization
Abstract
Background. This study investigated possible adverse effects of fire fighting on lung function in voluntary fire fighters (VFF). Methods. 328 out of 332 male VFF (98.8% response rate) and 125 male referents (100% response rare) participated. 290 VFF (88.4%) and 114 referents (91.2%) met the ECSC criteria for standardized lung function testing (1993). A Vitalograph(R)-Alpha spirometer was used. Smoking and sporting habits and respiratory and familial antecedents were inquired in a standardized questionnaire. Individual estimated number of fire interventions was used as exposure parameter. Statistics included analysis of variance and of covariance. Fisher's exact test and t-test were used where appropriate. Results. Overall, VFF had higher levels for FVC, FEV1 and FEV1/FVC ratio than referents. After correction for age, height and smoking habits, differences were significant for measured FEV1 and FEV1% (p<0.005). High-exposed VFF showed, after correction for smoking habits, significantly lower FEV1% values than low-exposed VFF, but significantly higher values than referents (p<0.005). Conclusions. VFF had better lung function than our reference population. This was probably due to a healthy worker effect. Amongst VFF, lung function was related to the number of fire interventions. Follow-up studies are necessary to affirm these findings.

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MLA
Terryn, D, L Decrans, Philippe Kiss, et al. “Evaluation of Lung Function in Voluntary Fire Fighters: Preliminary Results.” International Congress Series. Ed. K Chiyotani, Y Hosoda, & Y Aizawa. Vol. 1153. Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Elsevier Science, 1998. 88–91. Print.
APA
Terryn, D., Decrans, L., Kiss, P., De Meester, M., De Bacquer, D., De LOOF, P., Van Maele, F., et al. (1998). Evaluation of lung function in voluntary fire fighters: preliminary results. In K. Chiyotani, Y. Hosoda, & Y. Aizawa (Eds.), International Congress Series (Vol. 1153, pp. 88–91). Presented at the 9th International conference on Occupational Respiratory Diseases, Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Elsevier Science.
Chicago author-date
Terryn, D, L Decrans, Philippe Kiss, M De Meester, Dirk De Bacquer, P De LOOF, F Van Maele, A Thys, and H De Sutter. 1998. “Evaluation of Lung Function in Voluntary Fire Fighters: Preliminary Results.” In International Congress Series, ed. K Chiyotani, Y Hosoda, and Y Aizawa, 1153:88–91. Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Elsevier Science.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Terryn, D, L Decrans, Philippe Kiss, M De Meester, Dirk De Bacquer, P De LOOF, F Van Maele, A Thys, and H De Sutter. 1998. “Evaluation of Lung Function in Voluntary Fire Fighters: Preliminary Results.” In International Congress Series, ed. K Chiyotani, Y Hosoda, and Y Aizawa, 1153:88–91. Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Elsevier Science.
Vancouver
1.
Terryn D, Decrans L, Kiss P, De Meester M, De Bacquer D, De LOOF P, et al. Evaluation of lung function in voluntary fire fighters: preliminary results. In: Chiyotani K, Hosoda Y, Aizawa Y, editors. International Congress Series. Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Elsevier Science; 1998. p. 88–91.
IEEE
[1]
D. Terryn et al., “Evaluation of lung function in voluntary fire fighters: preliminary results,” in International Congress Series, Kyoto, Japan, 1998, vol. 1153, pp. 88–91.
@inproceedings{407006,
  abstract     = {Background. This study investigated possible adverse effects of fire fighting on lung function in voluntary fire fighters (VFF). 
Methods. 328 out of 332 male VFF (98.8% response rate) and 125 male referents (100% response rare) participated. 290 VFF (88.4%) and 114 referents (91.2%) met the ECSC criteria for standardized lung function testing (1993). A Vitalograph(R)-Alpha spirometer was used. Smoking and sporting habits and respiratory and familial antecedents were inquired in a standardized questionnaire. Individual estimated number of fire interventions was used as exposure parameter. Statistics included analysis of variance and of covariance. Fisher's exact test and t-test were used where appropriate. 
Results. Overall, VFF had higher levels for FVC, FEV1 and FEV1/FVC ratio than referents. After correction for age, height and smoking habits, differences were significant for measured FEV1 and FEV1% (p<0.005). High-exposed VFF showed, after correction for smoking habits, significantly lower FEV1% values than low-exposed VFF, but significantly higher values than referents (p<0.005). 
Conclusions. VFF had better lung function than our reference population. This was probably due to a healthy worker effect. Amongst VFF, lung function was related to the number of fire interventions. Follow-up studies are necessary to affirm these findings.},
  author       = {Terryn, D and Decrans, L and Kiss, Philippe and De Meester, M and De Bacquer, Dirk and De LOOF, P and Van Maele, F and Thys, A and De Sutter, H},
  booktitle    = {International Congress Series},
  editor       = {Chiyotani, K and Hosoda, Y and Aizawa, Y},
  issn         = {0531-5131},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Kyoto, Japan},
  pages        = {88--91},
  publisher    = {Elsevier Science},
  title        = {Evaluation of lung function in voluntary fire fighters: preliminary results},
  volume       = {1153},
  year         = {1998},
}

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