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A spider silk supportive matrix used for cartilage regeneration

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Organization
Abstract
Injured cartilage, not accreting by itself, often decreases the quality of life. The chondrocytes need an implanted support to bridge and recover the wound with extracellular matrix products forming fresh cartilage. Advances in cell biology and biomaterial research have lead to new possibilities in tissue engineering. Transplanted scaffolds, holding a 3D cell culture, should copy the cartilage characteristics. Strength and flexibility are important, but even more an adequate porosity, so the chondrocytes can migrate through the matrix, but are not able to float around. Looking for regeneration and not a repair, we want the scaffold material to disappear while real cartilage is healing the wound. In this way the material and its hydrolysis products have to be biocompatible and harmless. In the case of synthetic polymers, the hydrolysis products are frequently toxic, Spider silk is a promising fibre for many applications. Completely made out of protein a suspected biocompatibility is already proven. The harmless amino acid hydrolysis products make the silk a good candidate for creating a bioresorbable textile scaffold. The chondrocytes cells adhere quite well on the spider cocoon silk threads. Cocoons can be obtained each autumn in large numbers from the Araneus diadematus garden spider. The mechanical properties of the silk are more appropriate than polymeric gels, like hyaluronic acid, collagen and alginate, which have proved to be successful in 3D immobilisation and maintaining the differentiated phenotype of chondrocytes. The phenotypical products collagen II and aggrecan were also detected around the cells growing on the spider cocoon silk. A silk 3D textile could possibly be applied in combination with a polymer gel, probably alginate, in order to achieve some biomechanical stability. While biodegradation is occurring, the silk textile is overgrown with real cartilage and eventually the wound will be recovered without any definitive synthetic implants.
Keywords
REPAIR, FIBERS, PROTEINS, CELLS

Citation

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Chicago
Gellynck, Kris, Peter Verdonk, Karl Almqvist, Els Van Nimmen, Domir De Bakker, Lieva Van Langenhove, Johan Mertens, August Verbruggen, and Paul Kiekens. 2006. “A Spider Silk Supportive Matrix Used for Cartilage Regeneration.” In Woodhead Publishing in Textiles, ed. SC Anand, JF Kennedy, M Miraftab, and S Rajendran, 350–354. Cambridge, UK: Woodhead.
APA
Gellynck, Kris, Verdonk, P., Almqvist, K., Van Nimmen, E., De Bakker, D., Van Langenhove, L., Mertens, J., et al. (2006). A spider silk supportive matrix used for cartilage regeneration. In SC Anand, J. Kennedy, M. Miraftab, & S. Rajendran (Eds.), WOODHEAD PUBLISHING IN TEXTILES (pp. 350–354). Presented at the International Conference and Exhibition on Healthcare and Medical Textiles (MedTex 03), Cambridge, UK: Woodhead.
Vancouver
1.
Gellynck K, Verdonk P, Almqvist K, Van Nimmen E, De Bakker D, Van Langenhove L, et al. A spider silk supportive matrix used for cartilage regeneration. In: Anand S, Kennedy J, Miraftab M, Rajendran S, editors. WOODHEAD PUBLISHING IN TEXTILES. Cambridge, UK: Woodhead; 2006. p. 350–4.
MLA
Gellynck, Kris, Peter Verdonk, Karl Almqvist, et al. “A Spider Silk Supportive Matrix Used for Cartilage Regeneration.” Woodhead Publishing in Textiles. Ed. SC Anand et al. Cambridge, UK: Woodhead, 2006. 350–354. Print.
@inproceedings{405812,
  abstract     = {Injured cartilage, not accreting by itself, often decreases the quality of life. The chondrocytes need an implanted support to bridge and recover the wound with extracellular matrix products forming fresh cartilage. Advances in cell biology and biomaterial research have lead to new possibilities in tissue engineering. Transplanted scaffolds, holding a 3D cell culture, should copy the cartilage characteristics. Strength and flexibility are important, but even more an adequate porosity, so the chondrocytes can migrate through the matrix, but are not able to float around.
Looking for regeneration and not a repair, we want the scaffold material to disappear while real cartilage is healing the wound. In this way the material and its hydrolysis products have to be biocompatible and harmless. In the case of synthetic polymers, the hydrolysis products are frequently toxic, Spider silk is a promising fibre for many applications. Completely made out of protein a suspected biocompatibility is already proven. The harmless amino acid hydrolysis products make the silk a good candidate for creating a bioresorbable textile scaffold.
The chondrocytes cells adhere quite well on the spider cocoon silk threads. Cocoons can be obtained each autumn in large numbers from the Araneus diadematus garden spider. The mechanical properties of the silk are more appropriate than polymeric gels, like hyaluronic acid, collagen and alginate, which have proved to be successful in 3D immobilisation and maintaining the differentiated phenotype of chondrocytes. The phenotypical products collagen II and aggrecan were also detected around the cells growing on the spider cocoon silk. A silk 3D textile could possibly be applied in combination with a polymer gel, probably alginate, in order to achieve some biomechanical stability. While biodegradation is occurring, the silk textile is overgrown with real cartilage and eventually the wound will be recovered without any definitive synthetic implants.},
  author       = {Gellynck, Kris and Verdonk, Peter and Almqvist, Karl and Van Nimmen, Els and De Bakker, Domir and Van Langenhove, Lieva and Mertens, Johan and Verbruggen, August and Kiekens, Paul},
  booktitle    = {WOODHEAD PUBLISHING IN TEXTILES},
  editor       = {Anand, SC and Kennedy, JF and Miraftab, M and Rajendran, S},
  isbn         = {1-85573-683-7},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Bolton, UK},
  pages        = {350--354},
  publisher    = {Woodhead},
  title        = {A spider silk supportive matrix used for cartilage regeneration},
  year         = {2006},
}

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