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Micro-Raman spectroscopy applied to the investigation of art objects

Peter Vandenabeele (UGent) and Luc Moens (UGent)
Author
Organization
Abstract
Micro-Raman spectroscopy is excellently suited for the investigation of artefacts, as it is a fast and non-destructive method that can be applied for the identification of a whole range of materials. This identification depends on spectrum interpretation and on the comparison of the unknown spectrum with an extended library. Another advantage of Raman spectroscopy is that spectra can be recorded by direct analysis of the artefact or of micro-samples. The coupling of the spectrometer with a microscope reveals a high spatial resolution which allows spectra of individual grains with dimensions down to 1 mum to be recorded. Therefore a non-destructive micro-sampling method can be used. Raman spectroscopy can be applied for several types of materials and is applicable to ancient pieces as well as modem objects of art, An example is given on the Raman spectroscopic examination of miniatures from a mediaeval book of hours and of a 19(th) Century porcelain card.
Keywords
binding media, non-destructive analysis, pigments, Raman spectroscopy, paint, porcelain cards, art investigation, ARTISTS PIGMENTS, X-RAY-FLUORESCENCE, sampling, miniatures, Raman spectral interpretation

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Vandenabeele, Peter, and Luc Moens. “Micro-Raman Spectroscopy Applied to the Investigation of Art Objects.” Proceedings of SPIE, the International Society for Optical Engineering. Ed. David L Andrews et al. Vol. 4098. Bellingham, WA, USA: SPIE, the International Society for Optical Engineering, 2000. 232–240. Print.
APA
Vandenabeele, P., & Moens, L. (2000). Micro-Raman spectroscopy applied to the investigation of art objects. In D. L. Andrews, T. Asakura, S. Jutamulia, W. P. Kirk, M. G. Lagally, R. B. Lal, & J. D. Trolinger (Eds.), Proceedings of SPIE, the International Society for Optical Engineering (Vol. 4098, pp. 232–240). Presented at the Conference on Optical Devices and Diagnostics in Materials Science, Bellingham, WA, USA: SPIE, the International Society for Optical Engineering.
Chicago author-date
Vandenabeele, Peter, and Luc Moens. 2000. “Micro-Raman Spectroscopy Applied to the Investigation of Art Objects.” In Proceedings of SPIE, the International Society for Optical Engineering, ed. David L Andrews, Toshimitsu Asakura, Suganda Jutamulia, Wiley P Kirk, Max G Lagally, Ravindra B Lal, and James D Trolinger, 4098:232–240. Bellingham, WA, USA: SPIE, the International Society for Optical Engineering.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Vandenabeele, Peter, and Luc Moens. 2000. “Micro-Raman Spectroscopy Applied to the Investigation of Art Objects.” In Proceedings of SPIE, the International Society for Optical Engineering, ed. David L Andrews, Toshimitsu Asakura, Suganda Jutamulia, Wiley P Kirk, Max G Lagally, Ravindra B Lal, and James D Trolinger, 4098:232–240. Bellingham, WA, USA: SPIE, the International Society for Optical Engineering.
Vancouver
1.
Vandenabeele P, Moens L. Micro-Raman spectroscopy applied to the investigation of art objects. In: Andrews DL, Asakura T, Jutamulia S, Kirk WP, Lagally MG, Lal RB, et al., editors. Proceedings of SPIE, the International Society for Optical Engineering. Bellingham, WA, USA: SPIE, the International Society for Optical Engineering; 2000. p. 232–40.
IEEE
[1]
P. Vandenabeele and L. Moens, “Micro-Raman spectroscopy applied to the investigation of art objects,” in Proceedings of SPIE, the International Society for Optical Engineering, San Diego, CA, USA, 2000, vol. 4098, pp. 232–240.
@inproceedings{401174,
  abstract     = {Micro-Raman spectroscopy is excellently suited for the investigation of artefacts, as it is a fast and non-destructive method that can be applied for the identification of a whole range of materials. This identification depends on spectrum interpretation and on the comparison of the unknown spectrum with an extended library. Another advantage of Raman spectroscopy is that spectra can be recorded by direct analysis of the artefact or of micro-samples. The coupling of the spectrometer with a microscope reveals a high spatial resolution which allows spectra of individual grains with dimensions down to 1 mum to be recorded. Therefore a non-destructive micro-sampling method can be used. Raman spectroscopy can be applied for several types of materials and is applicable to ancient pieces as well as modem objects of art, An example is given on the Raman spectroscopic examination of miniatures from a mediaeval book of hours and of a 19(th) Century porcelain card.},
  author       = {Vandenabeele, Peter and Moens, Luc},
  booktitle    = {Proceedings of SPIE, the International Society for Optical Engineering},
  editor       = {Andrews, David L and Asakura, Toshimitsu and Jutamulia, Suganda and Kirk, Wiley P and Lagally, Max G and Lal, Ravindra B and Trolinger, James D},
  isbn         = {9780819437495},
  issn         = {0277-786X},
  keywords     = {binding media,non-destructive analysis,pigments,Raman spectroscopy,paint,porcelain cards,art investigation,ARTISTS PIGMENTS,X-RAY-FLUORESCENCE,sampling,miniatures,Raman spectral interpretation},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {San Diego, CA, USA},
  pages        = {232--240},
  publisher    = {SPIE, the International Society for Optical Engineering},
  title        = {Micro-Raman spectroscopy applied to the investigation of art objects},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.401633},
  volume       = {4098},
  year         = {2000},
}

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