Advanced search

Distinctie en memorie: symbolische investeringen in de eeuwigheid door laatmiddeleeuwse hoge ambtenren in het Graafschap Vlaanderen

(2003) TIJDSCHRIFT VOOR GESCHIEDENIS. 116(3). p.332-349
Author
Organization
Abstract
Funerary rituals and monuments reflect social differences and identities. Rich and self conscious mortals deliberately invest in representation after death to acquire or consolidate social status. Late medieval officials showed a high degree of upward social mobility and had a particular interest in representational strategies. They invested in chapels, tomb sculpture and pictorial art. Particular elements of the sign language typical for funerary monuments and inscriptions are related to the social position of the deceased. Officials imitated courtly and noble examples in their grave culture as a fundamental part of their social strategy and their search for distinction.

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Dumolyn, Jan, and Katrien Moermans. 2003. “Distinctie En Memorie: Symbolische Investeringen in De Eeuwigheid Door Laatmiddeleeuwse Hoge Ambtenren in Het Graafschap Vlaanderen.” Tijdschrift Voor Geschiedenis 116 (3): 332–349.
APA
Dumolyn, J., & Moermans, K. (2003). Distinctie en memorie: symbolische investeringen in de eeuwigheid door laatmiddeleeuwse hoge ambtenren in het Graafschap Vlaanderen. TIJDSCHRIFT VOOR GESCHIEDENIS, 116(3), 332–349.
Vancouver
1.
Dumolyn J, Moermans K. Distinctie en memorie: symbolische investeringen in de eeuwigheid door laatmiddeleeuwse hoge ambtenren in het Graafschap Vlaanderen. TIJDSCHRIFT VOOR GESCHIEDENIS. 2003;116(3):332–49.
MLA
Dumolyn, Jan, and Katrien Moermans. “Distinctie En Memorie: Symbolische Investeringen in De Eeuwigheid Door Laatmiddeleeuwse Hoge Ambtenren in Het Graafschap Vlaanderen.” TIJDSCHRIFT VOOR GESCHIEDENIS 116.3 (2003): 332–349. Print.
@article{397630,
  abstract     = {Funerary rituals and monuments reflect social differences and identities. Rich and self conscious mortals deliberately invest in representation after death to acquire or consolidate social status. Late medieval officials showed a high degree of upward social mobility and had a particular interest in representational strategies. They invested in chapels, tomb sculpture and pictorial art. Particular elements of the sign language typical for funerary monuments and inscriptions are related to the social position of the deceased. Officials imitated courtly and noble examples in their grave culture as a fundamental part of their social strategy and their search for distinction.},
  author       = {Dumolyn, Jan and Moermans, Katrien},
  issn         = {0040-7518},
  journal      = {TIJDSCHRIFT VOOR GESCHIEDENIS},
  language     = {dut},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {332--349},
  title        = {Distinctie en memorie: symbolische investeringen in de eeuwigheid door laatmiddeleeuwse hoge ambtenren in het Graafschap Vlaanderen},
  volume       = {116},
  year         = {2003},
}

Web of Science
Times cited: