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The practice of case management for substance abusers: what's in a name?

Wouter Vanderplasschen UGent and Jessica De Maeyer UGent (2007) ADIKTOLOGIE (TISNOV). 7(4). p.460-469
abstract
Despite the widespread application and popularity of case management, this intervention is not unanimously defined. Case management is characterized most accurately by its five basic functions: assessment, planning, linking, advocacy, and monitoring. These functions can be categorized in a cyclical process, preceded by a case finding and engagement-phase and followed by a disengagement-phase. As it is often unclear what this intervention entails, we explore what case managers’ tasks may imply in practice, based on a case study. A wide variety of case management activities (case finding and engagement) already take place before a client has actually become part of such a program. The assessment phase can be defined as a comprehensive inventory of clients’ strengths and weaknesses with a clear focus on community resources. Based on this assessment, goals are identified in all relevant life domains and a service plan is designed to address these problems and needs efficiently. Linkage is the core activity of case managers and can be defined as introducing persons to appropriate community resources and agencies according to their needs. Advocacy is speaking out on behalf of clients, in case agreements, obligations or rights are denied. Monitoring clients’ progress and adjusting service plans as needed is the last core function of case managers, and leads to reiteration of previous phases of the whole process or to disengagement. Ultimately, clients themselves play a central role in the case management process and will be the ones – in consultation with the case manager – to decide on the (next) steps to be taken.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
profile, substance abuse, case management, addiction, case study, drugs, case manager
journal title
ADIKTOLOGIE (TISNOV)
Adiktologie (Tišnov)
volume
7
issue
4
pages
460 - 469
ISSN
1213-3841
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A2
VABB id
c:vabb:203301
VABB type
VABB-1
id
391001
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-391001
date created
2008-03-04 22:36:00
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:44:13
@article{391001,
  abstract     = {Despite the widespread application and popularity of case management, this intervention is not unanimously defined. Case management is characterized most accurately by its five basic functions: assessment, planning, linking, advocacy, and monitoring. These functions can be categorized in a cyclical process, preceded by a case finding and engagement-phase and followed by a disengagement-phase. As it is often unclear what this intervention entails, we explore what case managers{\textquoteright} tasks may imply in practice, based on a case study. A wide variety of case management activities (case finding and engagement) already take place before a client has actually become part of such a program. The assessment phase can be defined as a comprehensive inventory of clients{\textquoteright} strengths and weaknesses with a clear focus on community resources. Based on this assessment, goals are identified in all relevant life domains and a service plan is designed to address these problems and needs efficiently. Linkage is the core activity of case managers and can be defined as introducing persons to appropriate community resources and agencies according to their needs. Advocacy is speaking out on behalf of clients, in case agreements, obligations or rights are denied. Monitoring clients{\textquoteright} progress and adjusting service plans as needed is the last core function of case managers, and leads to reiteration of previous phases of the whole process or to disengagement. Ultimately, clients themselves play a central role in the case management process and will be the ones -- in consultation with the case manager -- to decide on the (next) steps to be taken.},
  author       = {Vanderplasschen, Wouter and De Maeyer, Jessica},
  issn         = {1213-3841},
  journal      = {ADIKTOLOGIE (TISNOV)},
  keyword      = {profile,substance abuse,case management,addiction,case study,drugs,case manager},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {460--469},
  title        = {The practice of case management for substance abusers: what's in a name?},
  volume       = {7},
  year         = {2007},
}

Chicago
Vanderplasschen, Wouter, and Jessica De Maeyer. 2007. “The Practice of Case Management for Substance Abusers: What’s in a Name?” Adiktologie (tisnov) 7 (4): 460–469.
APA
Vanderplasschen, W., & De Maeyer, J. (2007). The practice of case management for substance abusers: what’s in a name? ADIKTOLOGIE (TISNOV), 7(4), 460–469.
Vancouver
1.
Vanderplasschen W, De Maeyer J. The practice of case management for substance abusers: what’s in a name? ADIKTOLOGIE (TISNOV). 2007;7(4):460–9.
MLA
Vanderplasschen, Wouter, and Jessica De Maeyer. “The Practice of Case Management for Substance Abusers: What’s in a Name?” ADIKTOLOGIE (TISNOV) 7.4 (2007): 460–469. Print.