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Severe infection, sepsis and acute kidney injury

(2007) ACTA CLINICA BELGICA. 62. p.332-336
Author
Organization
Abstract
Both severe infection and acute kidney injury (AKI) have a high, and rising incidence in critically ill patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU), and are associated with increased in-hospital mortality. Septic AKI patients are more severely ill compared to non-septic AKI patients and have worse outcome. Severe infection is a major cause of AKI in ICU patients, while conversely, AKI patients are at increased risk for infection. The dogma from the past relates the development of AKI in sepsis patients to decreased renal blood flow. However, current data suggest that there is no impairment of renal blood flow inpatients with sepsis. The pathogenesis of AKI in sepsis is probably related to cytotoxic effects of inflammation, and impaired microcirculation. In addition, hyperglycaemia, and antimicrobial agent-induced drug nephrotoxicity may contribute to the development of AKI. On the other hand, AKI patients are at greater risk for infection as a result of volume overload, dialysis catheter insertion and secondary manipulation, inflammation of the kidneys leading to 'organ cross talk', and impaired host immunity.
Keywords
acute kidney injury, ACUTE-RENAL-FAILURE, sepsis, CRITICALLY-ILL PATIENTS, INTENSIVE-CARE UNITS, BLOOD-STREAM INFECTION, ACTIVATED PROTEIN-C, HYPERDYNAMIC SEPSIS, INSULIN THERAPY, MULTICENTER, MORTALITY, NOREPINEPHRINE

Citation

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Chicago
Vandijck, Dominique, Emmelie Reynvoet, Stijn Blot, Els Vandecasteele, and Eric Hoste. 2007. “Severe Infection, Sepsis and Acute Kidney Injury.” Acta Clinica Belgica 62: 332–336.
APA
Vandijck, D., Reynvoet, E., Blot, S., Vandecasteele, E., & Hoste, E. (2007). Severe infection, sepsis and acute kidney injury. ACTA CLINICA BELGICA, 62, 332–336. Presented at the 2nd International meeting of Methodological Issue in Oral Health Research.
Vancouver
1.
Vandijck D, Reynvoet E, Blot S, Vandecasteele E, Hoste E. Severe infection, sepsis and acute kidney injury. ACTA CLINICA BELGICA. 2007;62:332–6.
MLA
Vandijck, Dominique, Emmelie Reynvoet, Stijn Blot, et al. “Severe Infection, Sepsis and Acute Kidney Injury.” ACTA CLINICA BELGICA 62 (2007): 332–336. Print.
@article{388223,
  abstract     = {Both severe infection and acute kidney injury (AKI) have a high, and rising incidence in critically ill patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU), and are associated with increased in-hospital mortality. Septic AKI patients are more severely ill compared to non-septic AKI patients and have worse outcome. Severe infection is a major cause of AKI in ICU patients, while conversely, AKI patients are at increased risk for infection. The dogma from the past relates the development of AKI in sepsis patients to decreased renal blood flow. However, current data suggest that there is no impairment of renal blood flow inpatients with sepsis. The pathogenesis of AKI in sepsis is probably related to cytotoxic effects of inflammation, and impaired microcirculation. In addition, hyperglycaemia, and antimicrobial agent-induced drug nephrotoxicity may contribute to the development of AKI. On the other hand, AKI patients are at greater risk for infection as a result of volume overload, dialysis catheter insertion and secondary manipulation, inflammation of the kidneys leading to 'organ cross talk', and impaired host immunity.},
  author       = {Vandijck, Dominique and Reynvoet, Emmelie and Blot, Stijn and Vandecasteele, Els and Hoste, Eric},
  issn         = {0001-5512},
  journal      = {ACTA CLINICA BELGICA},
  keyword      = {acute kidney injury,ACUTE-RENAL-FAILURE,sepsis,CRITICALLY-ILL PATIENTS,INTENSIVE-CARE UNITS,BLOOD-STREAM INFECTION,ACTIVATED PROTEIN-C,HYPERDYNAMIC SEPSIS,INSULIN THERAPY,MULTICENTER,MORTALITY,NOREPINEPHRINE},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Ghent, Belgium},
  pages        = {332--336},
  title        = {Severe infection, sepsis and acute kidney injury},
  volume       = {62},
  year         = {2007},
}

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