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Medical evidence and health policy: a marriage of convenience?: the case of proton pump inhibitors

Marie van Driel UGent, Robert Vander Stichele UGent, Jan De Maeseneer UGent, An De Sutter UGent and Thierry Christiaens UGent (2007) JOURNAL OF EVALUATION IN CLINICAL PRACTICE. 13(4). p.674-680
abstract
Rationale In Belgium, several policies regulating reimbursement of acid suppressant drugs and evidence-based recommendations for clinical practice were issued in a short period of time, creating a unique opportunity to observe their effect on prescribing. Aims and objectives To describe the evolution of prescriptions for acid suppressants and explore the interaction of policies and practice recommendations with prescribing patterns. Method Monthly claims-based data for proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and H-2-antihistamines by general practitioners, internists and "astroenterologists were obtained from the Belgian national health insurance database (1997-2005). The evolution of reimbursed defined daily doses and expenses after introduction of reimbursement regulations and dissemination of practice recommendations was explored. Results Recommendations had no impact on prescribing. All changes can be related to concomitant policies. Lifting reimbursement restrictions for cheaper products did not control growth or save costs in the Iona term. Only restricting reimbursement of all PPIs managed to curb the growth. We observed an unintended increase of non-omeprazole PPIs by gastroenterologists. Conclusions Reimbursement policies influence prescribing, but their effect can be unintended. A dialogue between policymakers and guideline developers, and evidence-based policies that are linked to clinical guidelines, could be an effective way to pursue both cost-containment and quality of care.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
evidence-based medicine, health policy, pharmaceutical economics, doctor's practice patterns, proton pump inhibitors, quality of care, GASTROESOPHAGEAL-REFLUX DISEASE, RANDOMIZED-TRIAL, PEPTIC-ULCER, PRIMARY-CARE, DYSPEPSIA, INTERVENTION, PRESCRIPTION, NETHERLANDS, INDUSTRY
journal title
JOURNAL OF EVALUATION IN CLINICAL PRACTICE
J. Eval. Clin. Pract.
volume
13
issue
4
pages
674 - 680
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000249096800028
JCR category
MEDICAL INFORMATICS
JCR impact factor
1.57 (2007)
JCR rank
7/20 (2007)
JCR quartile
2 (2007)
ISSN
1356-1294
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-2753.2007.00829.x
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
383099
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-383099
date created
2007-12-03 14:12:00
date last changed
2015-06-17 10:46:14
@article{383099,
  abstract     = {Rationale In Belgium, several policies regulating reimbursement of acid suppressant drugs and evidence-based recommendations for clinical practice were issued in a short period of time, creating a unique opportunity to observe their effect on prescribing. 
Aims and objectives To describe the evolution of prescriptions for acid suppressants and explore the interaction of policies and practice recommendations with prescribing patterns. 
Method Monthly claims-based data for proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and H-2-antihistamines by general practitioners, internists and {\textacutedbl}astroenterologists were obtained from the Belgian national health insurance database (1997-2005). The evolution of reimbursed defined daily doses and expenses after introduction of reimbursement regulations and dissemination of practice recommendations was explored. 
Results Recommendations had no impact on prescribing. All changes can be related to concomitant policies. Lifting reimbursement restrictions for cheaper products did not control growth or save costs in the Iona term. Only restricting reimbursement of all PPIs managed to curb the growth. We observed an unintended increase of non-omeprazole PPIs by gastroenterologists. 
Conclusions Reimbursement policies influence prescribing, but their effect can be unintended. A dialogue between policymakers and guideline developers, and evidence-based policies that are linked to clinical guidelines, could be an effective way to pursue both cost-containment and quality of care.},
  author       = {van Driel, Marie and Vander Stichele, Robert and De Maeseneer, Jan and De Sutter, An and Christiaens, Thierry},
  issn         = {1356-1294},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF EVALUATION IN CLINICAL PRACTICE},
  keyword      = {evidence-based medicine,health policy,pharmaceutical economics,doctor's practice patterns,proton pump inhibitors,quality of care,GASTROESOPHAGEAL-REFLUX DISEASE,RANDOMIZED-TRIAL,PEPTIC-ULCER,PRIMARY-CARE,DYSPEPSIA,INTERVENTION,PRESCRIPTION,NETHERLANDS,INDUSTRY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {674--680},
  title        = {Medical evidence and health policy: a marriage of convenience?: the case of proton pump inhibitors},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2753.2007.00829.x},
  volume       = {13},
  year         = {2007},
}

Chicago
van Driel, Marie, Robert Vander Stichele, Jan De Maeseneer, An De Sutter, and Thierry Christiaens. 2007. “Medical Evidence and Health Policy: a Marriage of Convenience?: The Case of Proton Pump Inhibitors.” Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 13 (4): 674–680.
APA
van Driel, Marie, Vander Stichele, R., De Maeseneer, J., De Sutter, A., & Christiaens, T. (2007). Medical evidence and health policy: a marriage of convenience?: the case of proton pump inhibitors. JOURNAL OF EVALUATION IN CLINICAL PRACTICE, 13(4), 674–680.
Vancouver
1.
van Driel M, Vander Stichele R, De Maeseneer J, De Sutter A, Christiaens T. Medical evidence and health policy: a marriage of convenience?: the case of proton pump inhibitors. JOURNAL OF EVALUATION IN CLINICAL PRACTICE. 2007;13(4):674–80.
MLA
van Driel, Marie, Robert Vander Stichele, Jan De Maeseneer, et al. “Medical Evidence and Health Policy: a Marriage of Convenience?: The Case of Proton Pump Inhibitors.” JOURNAL OF EVALUATION IN CLINICAL PRACTICE 13.4 (2007): 674–680. Print.