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The bovine luteal histological composition: a topographic point of view

Steven Cools, Wim Van Den Broeck UGent, Sarne De Vliegher UGent, Sofie Piepers UGent and Geert Opsomer UGent (2013) REPRODUCTION IN DOMESTIC ANIMALS. 48(2). p.e29-e32
abstract
Contents High-yielding dairy cows are struggling with a high incidence of embryonic loss, among others caused by an insufficient peripheral progesterone concentration which for its part might be associated with an impaired luteal progesterone production. This impaired capacity to produce progesterone might be reflected in the histology of the gland. The aim of the present pilot study was the assessment of the variation in cell density within a bovine luteal gland (LG), to examine whether it is possible to analyse histologically the functionality of the gland based on one single tissue sample. Six LGs (stage II or III) were harvested out of just as many healthy cows at the slaughterhouse. The luteal cell density was assessed by calculating the nuclear density (ND) of the different luteal cell types on haematoxylin-eosin-stained histological sections from a number of topographic regions evenly spread throughout the glands, to give an overview of the pattern of cellular distribution within the whole gland. Cells were differentiated into large luteal cells', small luteal cells' and non-steroidogenic cells'. Results show that the cellular density, within a tissue sample is not significantly influenced by its location in relation to the gland's equatorial plane. However, the position with respect to the polar axis of the gland has a decisive effect, as the ND is significantly higher (p<0.05) in the peripheral regions (outer zone) when compared with the central regions (inner zone) of the gland, and this counts for all three cell types.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
CORPORA-LUTEA, CORPUS-LUTEUM, ESTROUS-CYCLE, CELL-TYPES, COWS, PROGESTERONE, PREGNANCY, ENDOCRINE, CATTLE
journal title
REPRODUCTION IN DOMESTIC ANIMALS
Reprod. Domest. Anim.
volume
48
issue
2
pages
e29 - e32
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000316323800005
JCR category
AGRICULTURE, DAIRY & ANIMAL SCIENCE
JCR impact factor
1.177 (2013)
JCR rank
15/52 (2013)
JCR quartile
2 (2013)
ISSN
0936-6768
DOI
10.1111/rda.12129
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
3823473
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-3823473
date created
2013-06-20 10:49:45
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:45:08
@article{3823473,
  abstract     = {Contents High-yielding dairy cows are struggling with a high incidence of embryonic loss, among others caused by an insufficient peripheral progesterone concentration which for its part might be associated with an impaired luteal progesterone production. This impaired capacity to produce progesterone might be reflected in the histology of the gland. The aim of the present pilot study was the assessment of the variation in cell density within a bovine luteal gland (LG), to examine whether it is possible to analyse histologically the functionality of the gland based on one single tissue sample. Six LGs (stage II or III) were harvested out of just as many healthy cows at the slaughterhouse. The luteal cell density was assessed by calculating the nuclear density (ND) of the different luteal cell types on haematoxylin-eosin-stained histological sections from a number of topographic regions evenly spread throughout the glands, to give an overview of the pattern of cellular distribution within the whole gland. Cells were differentiated into large luteal cells', small luteal cells' and non-steroidogenic cells'. Results show that the cellular density, within a tissue sample is not significantly influenced by its location in relation to the gland's equatorial plane. However, the position with respect to the polar axis of the gland has a decisive effect, as the ND is significantly higher (p{\textlangle}0.05) in the peripheral regions (outer zone) when compared with the central regions (inner zone) of the gland, and this counts for all three cell types.},
  author       = {Cools, Steven and Van Den Broeck, Wim and De Vliegher, Sarne and Piepers, Sofie and Opsomer, Geert},
  issn         = {0936-6768},
  journal      = {REPRODUCTION IN DOMESTIC ANIMALS},
  keyword      = {CORPORA-LUTEA,CORPUS-LUTEUM,ESTROUS-CYCLE,CELL-TYPES,COWS,PROGESTERONE,PREGNANCY,ENDOCRINE,CATTLE},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {e29--e32},
  title        = {The bovine luteal histological composition: a topographic point of view},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/rda.12129},
  volume       = {48},
  year         = {2013},
}

Chicago
Cools, Steven, Wim Van Den Broeck, Sarne De Vliegher, Sofie Piepers, and Geert Opsomer. 2013. “The Bovine Luteal Histological Composition: a Topographic Point of View.” Reproduction in Domestic Animals 48 (2): e29–e32.
APA
Cools, Steven, Van Den Broeck, W., De Vliegher, S., Piepers, S., & Opsomer, G. (2013). The bovine luteal histological composition: a topographic point of view. REPRODUCTION IN DOMESTIC ANIMALS, 48(2), e29–e32.
Vancouver
1.
Cools S, Van Den Broeck W, De Vliegher S, Piepers S, Opsomer G. The bovine luteal histological composition: a topographic point of view. REPRODUCTION IN DOMESTIC ANIMALS. 2013;48(2):e29–e32.
MLA
Cools, Steven, Wim Van Den Broeck, Sarne De Vliegher, et al. “The Bovine Luteal Histological Composition: a Topographic Point of View.” REPRODUCTION IN DOMESTIC ANIMALS 48.2 (2013): e29–e32. Print.