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Condom use in Nigeria: evidence from two waves of a sexual behavior and condom use survey

Author
Organization
Abstract
HIV prevalence in Nigeria is increasing rapidly. Increased condom use is the most viable solution to slow down or reverse this trend. This paper uses data from two waves of a nationwide survey of over 5000 respondents each to examine factors that influence consistency of condom use with various types of partner. The results show that while the overall level of consistent condom use has remained low, reported consistent condom use with occasional partners and commercial sex workers exceeds 60%. There is also some evidence of an increasing trend in consistent condom use. The most important factors affecting consistency of condom use include awareness of the effectiveness of condom for the prevention of HIV and unwanted pregnancy, and concerns about unwanted pregnancy and HIV. Concern about unwanted pregnancy has a strong effect on consistency of condom use with stable partners, while concern about HIV infection has a strong effect on consistency of condom use with nonstable partners. The results suggest that HIV prevention programs need to do more than provide education about the modes of transmission and the ways to prevent infection. Improving the effectiveness of HIV prevention program is likely to require focusing more explicitly on people's personal risk perception, and condom efficacy. Focusing on these topics may further accelerate the observed positive trend in condom use.

Citation

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MLA
Van Rossem, Ronan, and Dominique Meekers. “Condom Use in Nigeria: Evidence from Two Waves of a Sexual Behavior and Condom Use Survey.” PSI Research Division Working Paper 2000 : 1–21. Print.
APA
Van Rossem, R., & Meekers, D. (2000). Condom use in Nigeria: evidence from two waves of a sexual behavior and condom use survey. PSI Research Division Working Paper. Washington, D.C. ; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA: Population Services International [PSI], Research Division.
Chicago author-date
Van Rossem, Ronan, and Dominique Meekers. 2000. “Condom Use in Nigeria: Evidence from Two Waves of a Sexual Behavior and Condom Use Survey.” PSI Research Division Working Paper. Washington, D.C. ; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA: Population Services International [PSI], Research Division.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Van Rossem, Ronan, and Dominique Meekers. 2000. “Condom Use in Nigeria: Evidence from Two Waves of a Sexual Behavior and Condom Use Survey.” PSI Research Division Working Paper. Washington, D.C. ; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA: Population Services International [PSI], Research Division.
Vancouver
1.
Van Rossem R, Meekers D. Condom use in Nigeria: evidence from two waves of a sexual behavior and condom use survey. PSI Research Division Working Paper. Washington, D.C. ; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA: Population Services International [PSI], Research Division; 2000. p. 1–21.
IEEE
[1]
R. Van Rossem and D. Meekers, “Condom use in Nigeria: evidence from two waves of a sexual behavior and condom use survey,” PSI Research Division Working Paper, vol. 31. Population Services International [PSI], Research Division, Washington, D.C. ; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, pp. 1–21, 2000.
@misc{376151,
  abstract     = {HIV prevalence in Nigeria is increasing rapidly. Increased condom use is the most viable solution to slow down or reverse this trend. This paper uses data from two waves of a nationwide survey of over 5000 respondents each to examine factors that influence consistency of condom use with various types of partner. The results show that while the overall level of consistent condom use has remained low, reported consistent condom use with occasional partners and commercial sex workers exceeds 60%. There is also some evidence of an increasing trend in consistent condom use. The most important factors affecting consistency of condom use include awareness of the effectiveness of condom for the prevention of HIV and unwanted pregnancy, and concerns about unwanted pregnancy and HIV. Concern about unwanted pregnancy has a strong effect on consistency of condom use with stable partners, while concern about HIV infection has a strong effect on consistency of condom use with nonstable partners. The results suggest that HIV prevention programs need to do more than provide education about the modes of transmission and the ways to prevent infection. Improving the effectiveness of HIV prevention program is likely to require focusing more explicitly on people's personal risk perception, and condom efficacy. Focusing on these topics may further accelerate the observed positive trend in condom use.},
  author       = {Van Rossem, Ronan and Meekers, Dominique},
  issn         = {N/A},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {1--21},
  publisher    = {Population Services International [PSI], Research Division},
  series       = {PSI Research Division Working Paper},
  title        = {Condom use in Nigeria: evidence from two waves of a sexual behavior and condom use survey},
  volume       = {31},
  year         = {2000},
}