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Effect of high water temperature (33 degrees C) on the clinical and virological outcome of experimental infections with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) in specific pathogen-free (SPF) Litopenaeus vannamei

Muhammad Rahman, CM ESCOBEDO-BONILLA, Mathias Corteel, JJ DANTAS-LIMA, Mathieu Wille UGent, VA SANZ, Maurice Pensaert, Patrick Sorgeloos UGent and Hans Nauwynck UGent (2006) AQUACULTURE. 261(3). p.842-849
abstract
White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is the most lethal pathogen of cultured shrimp. Previous studies done with undefined WSSV titers showed that high water temperature (32-33 degrees C) reduced/delayed mortality of WSSV-infected shrimp. This study evaluated the effect of high water temperature on the clinical and virological outcome of a WSSV infection under standardized conditions. Groups of specific pathogen-free Litopenaeus vannamei were challenged either by intramuscular or oral routes with a low (30 SID50) or a high (10,000 SID50) virus titer. Shrimp were kept (i) continuously at 27 degrees C, (ii) 30 degrees C or (iii) 33 degrees C; (iv) maintained at 33 degrees C before challenge and 27 degrees C afterwards, or (v) kept at 27 degrees C before challenge and 33 degrees C afterwards. Shrimp were maintained at the respective temperatures for 120 h before challenge and 120-144 h post challenge (hpc). Gross signs and mortality were monitored every 12 h until the end of the experiment. Dead and surviving shrimp were screened for WSSV infection (VP28-positive cells) by indirect immunofluorescence (1117). Shrimp kept continuously at 27 degrees C or 30 degrees C, or switched to 27 degrees C post challenge developed gross signs within 24 hpc, first mortalities at 36-60 hpc and 100% cumulative mortality between 60 and 144 hpc depending on the virus titer. All dead shrimp were WSSV-positive. In contrast, shrimp kept at 33 degrees C continuously or after WSSV challenge showed no signs of disease and low mortalities (0-30%) regardless of the virus titer. Dead and surviving shrimp were WSSV-negative. Further, early virus replication was studied in two groups of shrimp: one maintained at 27 degrees C before and after challenge and one switched from 27 degrees C to 33 degrees C after challenge with 10,000 SID50. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis showed that WSSV-positive cells were first displayed at 12 hpc in shrimp kept at 27 degrees C and by 24 hpc the infection became systemic. In contrast, shrimp kept at 33 degrees C did not display WSSV-positive cells at 12 or 24 hpc. This work confirms previous reports that high water temperature prevents the onset of disease and significantly reduces mortality of WSSV-inoculated shrimp regardless of the route of inoculation or virus titer used. This strategy may have practical applications to control WSSV in tropical shrimp farming countries.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
journal title
AQUACULTURE
Aquaculture
volume
261
issue
3
pages
842-849 pages
publisher
Elsevier Science
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000242469100002
JCR category
FISHERIES
JCR impact factor
2.081 (2006)
JCR rank
3/41 (2006)
JCR quartile
1 (2006)
ISSN
0044-8486
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
id
353168
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-353168
date created
2007-01-29 08:37:00
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:44:38
@article{353168,
  abstract     = {White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is the most lethal pathogen of cultured shrimp. Previous studies done with undefined WSSV titers showed that high water temperature (32-33 degrees C) reduced/delayed mortality of WSSV-infected shrimp. This study evaluated the effect of high water temperature on the clinical and virological outcome of a WSSV infection under standardized conditions. Groups of specific pathogen-free Litopenaeus vannamei were challenged either by intramuscular or oral routes with a low (30 SID50) or a high (10,000 SID50) virus titer. Shrimp were kept (i) continuously at 27 degrees C, (ii) 30 degrees C or (iii) 33 degrees C; (iv) maintained at 33 degrees C before challenge and 27 degrees C afterwards, or (v) kept at 27 degrees C before challenge and 33 degrees C afterwards. Shrimp were maintained at the respective temperatures for 120 h before challenge and 120-144 h post challenge (hpc). Gross signs and mortality were monitored every 12 h until the end of the experiment. Dead and surviving shrimp were screened for WSSV infection (VP28-positive cells) by indirect immunofluorescence (1117). Shrimp kept continuously at 27 degrees C or 30 degrees C, or switched to 27 degrees C post challenge developed gross signs within 24 hpc, first mortalities at 36-60 hpc and 100\% cumulative mortality between 60 and 144 hpc depending on the virus titer. All dead shrimp were WSSV-positive. In contrast, shrimp kept at 33 degrees C continuously or after WSSV challenge showed no signs of disease and low mortalities (0-30\%) regardless of the virus titer. Dead and surviving shrimp were WSSV-negative. Further, early virus replication was studied in two groups of shrimp: one maintained at 27 degrees C before and after challenge and one switched from 27 degrees C to 33 degrees C after challenge with 10,000 SID50. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis showed that WSSV-positive cells were first displayed at 12 hpc in shrimp kept at 27 degrees C and by 24 hpc the infection became systemic. In contrast, shrimp kept at 33 degrees C did not display WSSV-positive cells at 12 or 24 hpc. This work confirms previous reports that high water temperature prevents the onset of disease and significantly reduces mortality of WSSV-inoculated shrimp regardless of the route of inoculation or virus titer used. This strategy may have practical applications to control WSSV in tropical shrimp farming countries.},
  author       = {Rahman, Muhammad and ESCOBEDO-BONILLA, CM and Corteel, Mathias and DANTAS-LIMA, JJ and Wille, Mathieu and SANZ, VA and Pensaert, Maurice and Sorgeloos, Patrick and Nauwynck, Hans},
  issn         = {0044-8486},
  journal      = {AQUACULTURE},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {842--849},
  publisher    = {Elsevier Science},
  title        = {Effect of high water temperature (33 degrees C) on the clinical and virological outcome of experimental infections with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) in specific pathogen-free (SPF) Litopenaeus vannamei},
  volume       = {261},
  year         = {2006},
}

Chicago
Rahman, Muhammad, CM ESCOBEDO-BONILLA, Mathias Corteel, JJ DANTAS-LIMA, Mathieu Wille, VA SANZ, Maurice Pensaert, Patrick Sorgeloos, and Hans Nauwynck. 2006. “Effect of High Water Temperature (33 Degrees C) on the Clinical and Virological Outcome of Experimental Infections with White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) in Specific Pathogen-free (SPF) Litopenaeus Vannamei.” Aquaculture 261 (3): 842–849.
APA
Rahman, Muhammad, ESCOBEDO-BONILLA, C., Corteel, M., DANTAS-LIMA, J., Wille, M., SANZ, V., Pensaert, M., et al. (2006). Effect of high water temperature (33 degrees C) on the clinical and virological outcome of experimental infections with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) in specific pathogen-free (SPF) Litopenaeus vannamei. AQUACULTURE, 261(3), 842–849.
Vancouver
1.
Rahman M, ESCOBEDO-BONILLA C, Corteel M, DANTAS-LIMA J, Wille M, SANZ V, et al. Effect of high water temperature (33 degrees C) on the clinical and virological outcome of experimental infections with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) in specific pathogen-free (SPF) Litopenaeus vannamei. AQUACULTURE. Elsevier Science; 2006;261(3):842–9.
MLA
Rahman, Muhammad, CM ESCOBEDO-BONILLA, Mathias Corteel, et al. “Effect of High Water Temperature (33 Degrees C) on the Clinical and Virological Outcome of Experimental Infections with White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) in Specific Pathogen-free (SPF) Litopenaeus Vannamei.” AQUACULTURE 261.3 (2006): 842–849. Print.