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Processing of complementary food does not increase hair zinc levels and growth of infants in Kilosa district, rural Tanzania

(2006) BRITISH JOURNAL OF NUTRITION. 95(1). p.174-180
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Abstract
A community-based, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial was conducted from March 2001 to March 2002 in Kilosa, a rural district of Morogoro Region in Tanzania. One hundred and fifty-eight infants were selected randomly from lists of local Maternal and Child Health Care Centres and received either processed complementary food (PCF) or unprocessed complementary food (UPCF) from age 6 to 12 months. Processing increased Zn solubility and energy density of the porridge prepared from the complementary food (CF) as determined in vitro. Phytate:Zn molar ratio of the PCF and UPCF was 25.8 and 47.5, respectively. Under the study conditions, the processing of CF did not improve Zn status as measured by hair analysis. No significant correlations were found between hair Zn values and anthropometric measurements. Our findings suggest that processing alone of cereal-based CF may be insufficient to ensure an adequate supply of Zn to improve growth and Zn status of infants. Dietary modification to tackle Zn deficiencies in similar target groups may therefore only be successful when other Zn-rich foods such as meat and fish are included.
Keywords
SUPPLEMENTATION, CHILDREN, IN-VITRO, FINGER MILLET, DEVELOPING-COUNTRIES, RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL, Tanzania, infant growth, complementary food, zinc status, BIOAVAILABILITY, ABSORPTION, IRON, HOMEOSTASIS

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Chicago
Lachat, Carl, John Van Camp, Peter S Mamiro, Francis O Wayua, Anne Opsomer, Dominique A Roberfroid, and Patrick Kolsteren. 2006. “Processing of Complementary Food Does Not Increase Hair Zinc Levels and Growth of Infants in Kilosa District, Rural Tanzania.” British Journal of Nutrition 95 (1): 174–180.
APA
Lachat, C., Van Camp, J., Mamiro, P. S., Wayua, F. O., Opsomer, A., Roberfroid, D. A., & Kolsteren, P. (2006). Processing of complementary food does not increase hair zinc levels and growth of infants in Kilosa district, rural Tanzania. BRITISH JOURNAL OF NUTRITION, 95(1), 174–180.
Vancouver
1.
Lachat C, Van Camp J, Mamiro PS, Wayua FO, Opsomer A, Roberfroid DA, et al. Processing of complementary food does not increase hair zinc levels and growth of infants in Kilosa district, rural Tanzania. BRITISH JOURNAL OF NUTRITION. 2006;95(1):174–80.
MLA
Lachat, Carl, John Van Camp, Peter S Mamiro, et al. “Processing of Complementary Food Does Not Increase Hair Zinc Levels and Growth of Infants in Kilosa District, Rural Tanzania.” BRITISH JOURNAL OF NUTRITION 95.1 (2006): 174–180. Print.
@article{350916,
  abstract     = {A community-based, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial was conducted from March 2001 to March 2002 in Kilosa, a rural district of Morogoro Region in Tanzania. One hundred and fifty-eight infants were selected randomly from lists of local Maternal and Child Health Care Centres and received either processed complementary food (PCF) or unprocessed complementary food (UPCF) from age 6 to 12 months. Processing increased Zn solubility and energy density of the porridge prepared from the complementary food (CF) as determined in vitro. Phytate:Zn molar ratio of the PCF and UPCF was 25.8 and 47.5, respectively. Under the study conditions, the processing of CF did not improve Zn status as measured by hair analysis. No significant correlations were found between hair Zn values and anthropometric measurements. Our findings suggest that processing alone of cereal-based CF may be insufficient to ensure an adequate supply of Zn to improve growth and Zn status of infants. Dietary modification to tackle Zn deficiencies in similar target groups may therefore only be successful when other Zn-rich foods such as meat and fish are included.},
  author       = {Lachat, Carl and Van Camp, John and Mamiro, Peter S and Wayua, Francis O and Opsomer, Anne and Roberfroid, Dominique A and Kolsteren, Patrick},
  issn         = {0007-1145},
  journal      = {BRITISH JOURNAL OF NUTRITION},
  keyword      = {SUPPLEMENTATION,CHILDREN,IN-VITRO,FINGER MILLET,DEVELOPING-COUNTRIES,RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL,Tanzania,infant growth,complementary food,zinc status,BIOAVAILABILITY,ABSORPTION,IRON,HOMEOSTASIS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {174--180},
  title        = {Processing of complementary food does not increase hair zinc levels and growth of infants in Kilosa district, rural Tanzania},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1079/BJN20051610},
  volume       = {95},
  year         = {2006},
}

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