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Can field distributions of marine predacious nematodes be explained by sediment constraints on their foraging success?

Fabiane GALLUCCI, Maaike Steyaert and Tom Moens UGent (2005) MARINE ECOLOGY-PROGRESS SERIES. 304. p.167-178
abstract
Factors controlling field distributions of benthic infauna remain poorly understood. Enoploides longispiculosus is a prominent predacious nematode in sandy sediments of the North Sea and adjacent estuaries. This study assesses the distribution of E. longispiculosus and of prey nematodes in an intertidal flat (the Paulina) relative to variation in sediment characteristics. Predator densities varied strongly, even between sites with only subtle differences in sediment composition. E. longispiculosus abundances were positively correlated with grain size, proportion of fine sand and emersion period during low tides, and negatively with silt, very fine sand content and prey densities. We then tested whether and how grain size, silt content and water content affected predation rates and prey selectivity in E. longispiculosus using microcosm experiments with 2 prey species. Each of these sediment characteristics per se strongly affected predation efficiency but not selectivity. Increases in silt fraction and decreases in grain size and water content strongly reduced predation rate. These effects compared exceptionally well with the range of silt contents and grain sizes in which E. longispiculosus is abundant on the Paulina tidal flat, suggesting that its field distribution is governed at least in part by sedimentary effects on foraging efficiency. Sediment water content also impacted predation rates; however, its effect did not follow a pattern predicted by field data on emersion time. Hence, even small shifts in sediment composition may strongly affect the activity of predacious nematodes, and both temporal and small-scale spatial variability in sediment characteristics likely affects predator-prey dynamics on tidal flats.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
journal title
MARINE ECOLOGY-PROGRESS SERIES
Mar. Ecol.-Prog. Ser.
volume
304
pages
167-178 pages
publisher
INTER-RESEARCH
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000234750100015
JCR category
OCEANOGRAPHY
JCR impact factor
2.315 (2005)
JCR rank
6/46 (2005)
JCR quartile
1 (2005)
ISSN
0171-8630
DOI
1854/5434
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
id
350886
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-350886
date created
2006-06-20 09:51:00
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:43:20
@article{350886,
  abstract     = {Factors controlling field distributions of benthic infauna remain poorly understood. Enoploides longispiculosus is a prominent predacious nematode in sandy sediments of the North Sea and adjacent estuaries. This study assesses the distribution of E. longispiculosus and of prey nematodes in an intertidal flat (the Paulina) relative to variation in sediment characteristics. Predator densities varied strongly, even between sites with only subtle differences in sediment composition. E. longispiculosus abundances were positively correlated with grain size, proportion of fine sand and emersion period during low tides, and negatively with silt, very fine sand content and prey densities. We then tested whether and how grain size, silt content and water content affected predation rates and prey selectivity in E. longispiculosus using microcosm experiments with 2 prey species. Each of these sediment characteristics per se strongly affected predation efficiency but not selectivity. Increases in silt fraction and decreases in grain size and water content strongly reduced predation rate. These effects compared exceptionally well with the range of silt contents and grain sizes in which E. longispiculosus is abundant on the Paulina tidal flat, suggesting that its field distribution is governed at least in part by sedimentary effects on foraging efficiency. Sediment water content also impacted predation rates; however, its effect did not follow a pattern predicted by field data on emersion time. Hence, even small shifts in sediment composition may strongly affect the activity of predacious nematodes, and both temporal and small-scale spatial variability in sediment characteristics likely affects predator-prey dynamics on tidal flats.},
  author       = {GALLUCCI, Fabiane and Steyaert, Maaike and Moens, Tom},
  issn         = {0171-8630},
  journal      = {MARINE ECOLOGY-PROGRESS SERIES},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {167--178},
  publisher    = {INTER-RESEARCH},
  title        = {Can field distributions of marine predacious nematodes be explained by sediment constraints on their foraging success?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/1854/5434},
  volume       = {304},
  year         = {2005},
}

Chicago
GALLUCCI, Fabiane, Maaike Steyaert, and Tom Moens. 2005. “Can Field Distributions of Marine Predacious Nematodes Be Explained by Sediment Constraints on Their Foraging Success?” Marine Ecology-progress Series 304: 167–178.
APA
GALLUCCI, F., Steyaert, M., & Moens, T. (2005). Can field distributions of marine predacious nematodes be explained by sediment constraints on their foraging success? MARINE ECOLOGY-PROGRESS SERIES, 304, 167–178.
Vancouver
1.
GALLUCCI F, Steyaert M, Moens T. Can field distributions of marine predacious nematodes be explained by sediment constraints on their foraging success? MARINE ECOLOGY-PROGRESS SERIES. INTER-RESEARCH; 2005;304:167–78.
MLA
GALLUCCI, Fabiane, Maaike Steyaert, and Tom Moens. “Can Field Distributions of Marine Predacious Nematodes Be Explained by Sediment Constraints on Their Foraging Success?” MARINE ECOLOGY-PROGRESS SERIES 304 (2005): 167–178. Print.