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Impact of MELD on short-term and long-term outcome following liver transplantation: a European perspective

Evi Nagler, Hans Van Vlierberghe UGent, Isabelle Colle UGent, Roberto Troisi UGent and Bernard de Hemptinne (2005) EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF GASTROENTEROLOGY & HEPATOLOGY. 17(8). p.849-856
abstract
Introduction The Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) has been found to accurately predict pre-transplant mortality and is a valuable system for ranking patients in need of liver transplantation. Its association with post-transplant outcome, however, remains unclear. Materials and methods We retrospectively studied 121 adult patients who were transplanted for non-fulminant liver failure between January 1991 and December 2001. MELD scores were calculated taking variables as close as possible prior to liver transplantation. Patients were stratified into two or three groups using different cut-off values of the MELD score. Results Indications for liver transplantation were mainly alcoholic liver disease (47.1%) or hepatitis C virus (19.0%). Gender distribution was male 62% vs female 38%. Mean age was 54 years 10 years. Mean MELD score was 16 +/- 6. Follow-up time was 5.4 years (range, 1.6-12.3 years). The use of different MELD cut-off levels yielded no difference in survival at different time points. Conclusion Higher MELD scores did not have a negative impact on patient and graft survival following OLT. Since MELD is good at identifying those urgently in need of liver transplantation and high MELD scores do not appear to have an influence on long-term outcome, use of MELD in liver allocation seems warranted.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
SURVIVAL, allocation system, MODEL, SCORE, DISEASE, ALLOCATION, MORTALITY, CANDIDATES, UTILITY, DONORS, RISK-FACTORS, MELD score, Child-Pugh score, liver transplantation
journal title
EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF GASTROENTEROLOGY & HEPATOLOGY
Eur. J. Gastroenterol. Hepatol.
volume
17
issue
8
pages
849 - 856
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000231392100012
JCR category
GASTROENTEROLOGY & HEPATOLOGY
JCR impact factor
1.69 (2005)
JCR rank
29/46 (2005)
JCR quartile
3 (2005)
ISSN
0954-691X
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
350473
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-350473
date created
2006-04-10 10:13:00
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:43:09
@article{350473,
  abstract     = {Introduction The Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) has been found to accurately predict pre-transplant mortality and is a valuable system for ranking patients in need of liver transplantation. Its association with post-transplant outcome, however, remains unclear.
Materials and methods We retrospectively studied 121 adult patients who were transplanted for non-fulminant liver failure between January 1991 and December 2001. MELD scores were calculated taking variables as close as possible prior to liver transplantation. Patients were stratified into two or three groups using different cut-off values of the MELD score.
Results Indications for liver transplantation were mainly alcoholic liver disease (47.1\%) or hepatitis C virus (19.0\%). Gender distribution was male 62\% vs female 38\%. Mean age was 54 years 10 years. Mean MELD score was 16 +/- 6. Follow-up time was 5.4 years (range, 1.6-12.3 years). The use of different MELD cut-off levels yielded no difference in survival at different time points.
Conclusion Higher MELD scores did not have a negative impact on patient and graft survival following OLT. Since MELD is good at identifying those urgently in need of liver transplantation and high MELD scores do not appear to have an influence on long-term outcome, use of MELD in liver allocation seems warranted.},
  author       = {Nagler, Evi and Van Vlierberghe, Hans and Colle, Isabelle and Troisi, Roberto and de Hemptinne, Bernard},
  issn         = {0954-691X},
  journal      = {EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF GASTROENTEROLOGY \& HEPATOLOGY},
  keyword      = {SURVIVAL,allocation system,MODEL,SCORE,DISEASE,ALLOCATION,MORTALITY,CANDIDATES,UTILITY,DONORS,RISK-FACTORS,MELD score,Child-Pugh score,liver transplantation},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {849--856},
  title        = {Impact of MELD on short-term and long-term outcome following liver transplantation: a European perspective},
  volume       = {17},
  year         = {2005},
}

Chicago
NAGLER, EVI, Hans Van Vlierberghe, Isabelle Colle, Roberto Troisi, and Bernard de Hemptinne. 2005. “Impact of MELD on Short-term and Long-term Outcome Following Liver Transplantation: a European Perspective.” European Journal of Gastroenterology & Hepatology 17 (8): 849–856.
APA
NAGLER, E., Van Vlierberghe, H., Colle, I., Troisi, R., & de Hemptinne, B. (2005). Impact of MELD on short-term and long-term outcome following liver transplantation: a European perspective. EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF GASTROENTEROLOGY & HEPATOLOGY, 17(8), 849–856.
Vancouver
1.
NAGLER E, Van Vlierberghe H, Colle I, Troisi R, de Hemptinne B. Impact of MELD on short-term and long-term outcome following liver transplantation: a European perspective. EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF GASTROENTEROLOGY & HEPATOLOGY. 2005;17(8):849–56.
MLA
NAGLER, EVI, Hans Van Vlierberghe, Isabelle Colle, et al. “Impact of MELD on Short-term and Long-term Outcome Following Liver Transplantation: a European Perspective.” EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF GASTROENTEROLOGY & HEPATOLOGY 17.8 (2005): 849–856. Print.