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Evidence of changes in sural nerve conduction mediated by light emitting diode irradiation

Elke Vinck, Pascal Coorevits UGent, Barbara Cagnie UGent, Martine De Muynck UGent, Guy Vanderstraeten UGent and Dirk Cambier UGent (2005) LASERS IN MEDICAL SCIENCE. 20(1). p.35-40
abstract
The introduction of light emitting diode (LED) devices as a novel treatment for pain relief in place of low-level laser warrants fundamental research on the effect of LED devices on one of the potential explanatory mechanisms: peripheral neurophysiology in vivo. A randomised controlled study was conducted by measuring antidromic nerve conduction on the peripheral sural nerve of healthy subjects (n=64). One baseline measurement and five post-irradiation recordings (2-min interval each) were performed of the nerve conduction velocity (NCV) and negative peak latency (NPL). Interventional set-up was identical for all subjects, but the experimental group (=32) received an irradiation (2 min at a continuous power output of 160 mW, resulting in a radiant exposure of 1.07 J/cm(2)) with an infrared LED device (BIO-DIO preprototype; MDB-Laser, Belgium), while the placebo group was treated by sham irradiation. Statistical analysis (general regression nodel for repeated measures) of NCV and NPL difference scores, revealed a significant interactive effect for both NCV (P=0.003) and NPL (P=0.006). Further post hoc LSD analysis showed a time-related statistical significant decreased NCV and an increased NPL in the experimental group and a statistical significant difference between placebo and experimental group at various points of time. Based on these results, it can be concluded that LED irradiation, applied to intact skin at the described irradiation parameters, produces an immediate and localized effect upon conduction characteristics in underlying nerves. Therefore, the outcome of this in vivo experiment yields a potential explanation for pain relief induced by LED.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
light emitting diodes, sural nerve, conduction velocity, negative peak latency, analgesic effect, INFRARED-LASER IRRADIATION, SUPERFICIAL RADIAL NERVE, EVOKED-POTENTIALS, SKIN TEMPERATURE, IN-VIVO, 890 NM, LATENCIES, EXPOSURE, LOCALIZATION, RELEVANCE
journal title
LASERS IN MEDICAL SCIENCE
Lasers Med. Sci.
volume
20
issue
1
pages
35 - 40
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000230909900006
JCR category
SURGERY
JCR impact factor
1.27 (2005)
JCR rank
53/138 (2005)
JCR quartile
2 (2005)
ISSN
0268-8921
DOI
10.1007/s10103-005-0333-2
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
350409
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-350409
date created
2006-02-01 10:47:00
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:43:08
@article{350409,
  abstract     = {The introduction of light emitting diode (LED) devices as a novel treatment for pain relief in place of low-level laser warrants fundamental research on the effect of LED devices on one of the potential explanatory mechanisms: peripheral neurophysiology in vivo. A randomised controlled study was conducted by measuring antidromic nerve conduction on the peripheral sural nerve of healthy subjects (n=64). One baseline measurement and five post-irradiation recordings (2-min interval each) were performed of the nerve conduction velocity (NCV) and negative peak latency (NPL). Interventional set-up was identical for all subjects, but the experimental group (=32) received an irradiation (2 min at a continuous power output of 160 mW, resulting in a radiant exposure of 1.07 J/cm(2)) with an infrared LED device (BIO-DIO preprototype; MDB-Laser, Belgium), while the placebo group was treated by sham irradiation. Statistical analysis (general regression nodel for repeated measures) of NCV and NPL difference scores, revealed a significant interactive effect for both NCV (P=0.003) and NPL (P=0.006). Further post hoc LSD analysis showed a time-related statistical significant decreased NCV and an increased NPL in the experimental group and a statistical significant difference between placebo and experimental group at various points of time. Based on these results, it can be concluded that LED irradiation, applied to intact skin at the described irradiation parameters, produces an immediate and localized effect upon conduction characteristics in underlying nerves. Therefore, the outcome of this in vivo experiment yields a potential explanation for pain relief induced by LED.},
  author       = {Vinck, Elke and Coorevits, Pascal and Cagnie, Barbara and De Muynck, Martine and Vanderstraeten, Guy and Cambier, Dirk},
  issn         = {0268-8921},
  journal      = {LASERS IN MEDICAL SCIENCE},
  keyword      = {light emitting diodes,sural nerve,conduction velocity,negative peak latency,analgesic effect,INFRARED-LASER IRRADIATION,SUPERFICIAL RADIAL NERVE,EVOKED-POTENTIALS,SKIN TEMPERATURE,IN-VIVO,890 NM,LATENCIES,EXPOSURE,LOCALIZATION,RELEVANCE},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {35--40},
  title        = {Evidence of changes in sural nerve conduction mediated by light emitting diode irradiation},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10103-005-0333-2},
  volume       = {20},
  year         = {2005},
}

Chicago
Vinck, Elke, Pascal Coorevits, Barbara Cagnie, Martine De Muynck, Guy Vanderstraeten, and Dirk Cambier. 2005. “Evidence of Changes in Sural Nerve Conduction Mediated by Light Emitting Diode Irradiation.” Lasers in Medical Science 20 (1): 35–40.
APA
Vinck, Elke, Coorevits, P., Cagnie, B., De Muynck, M., Vanderstraeten, G., & Cambier, D. (2005). Evidence of changes in sural nerve conduction mediated by light emitting diode irradiation. LASERS IN MEDICAL SCIENCE, 20(1), 35–40.
Vancouver
1.
Vinck E, Coorevits P, Cagnie B, De Muynck M, Vanderstraeten G, Cambier D. Evidence of changes in sural nerve conduction mediated by light emitting diode irradiation. LASERS IN MEDICAL SCIENCE. 2005;20(1):35–40.
MLA
Vinck, Elke, Pascal Coorevits, Barbara Cagnie, et al. “Evidence of Changes in Sural Nerve Conduction Mediated by Light Emitting Diode Irradiation.” LASERS IN MEDICAL SCIENCE 20.1 (2005): 35–40. Print.