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Sustained suppression in congruency tasks

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Organization
Abstract
In a list version of the Stroop task, Thomas (1977) observed that Stroop interference was smaller when the irrelevant word was repeated through parts of the list. MacLeod (1991) formulated the sustained-suppression hypothesis for this effect. It is assumed that the automatic response activation on the basis of the irrelevant word is selectively suppressed. In this paper this hypothesis is further investigated. In a serial Stroop task with short response-stimulus interval (RSI) we demonstrate that the Stroop effect disappears when the irrelevant word is repeated, whereas the Stroop effect is evident when the word changes. With a long RSI, there is no influence of the sequence of the irrelevant word. The same pattern of results is observed in a flanker task. The results are discussed in terms of the activation-suppression model (Ridderinkhof, 2002) and the sustained-suppression hypothesis.
Keywords
STIMULUS-RESPONSE COMPATIBILITY, SPATIAL STIMULUS, SELECTIVE ATTENTION, INTERFERENCE, ACTIVATION, CONFLICT, MODEL, AUTOMATICITY, INFORMATION, WORDS

Citation

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Chicago
Notebaert, Wim, and Eric Soetens. 2006. “Sustained Suppression in Congruency Tasks.” Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology 59 (1): 178–189.
APA
Notebaert, W., & Soetens, E. (2006). Sustained suppression in congruency tasks. QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY, 59(1), 178–189. Presented at the 44th Annual Meeting of the Psychonomic-Society.
Vancouver
1.
Notebaert W, Soetens E. Sustained suppression in congruency tasks. QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY. 2006;59(1):178–89.
MLA
Notebaert, Wim, and Eric Soetens. “Sustained Suppression in Congruency Tasks.” QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY 59.1 (2006): 178–189. Print.
@article{337828,
  abstract     = {In a list version of the Stroop task, Thomas (1977) observed that Stroop interference was smaller when the irrelevant word was repeated through parts of the list. MacLeod (1991) formulated the sustained-suppression hypothesis for this effect. It is assumed that the automatic response activation on the basis of the irrelevant word is selectively suppressed. In this paper this hypothesis is further investigated. In a serial Stroop task with short response-stimulus interval (RSI) we demonstrate that the Stroop effect disappears when the irrelevant word is repeated, whereas the Stroop effect is evident when the word changes. With a long RSI, there is no influence of the sequence of the irrelevant word. The same pattern of results is observed in a flanker task. The results are discussed in terms of the activation-suppression model (Ridderinkhof, 2002) and the sustained-suppression hypothesis.},
  author       = {Notebaert, Wim and Soetens, Eric},
  issn         = {1747-0218},
  journal      = {QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Vancouver, Canada},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {178--189},
  title        = {Sustained suppression in congruency tasks},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17470210500151360},
  volume       = {59},
  year         = {2006},
}

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