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Naming two-digit arabic numerals, evidence from masked priming studies

Elie Ratinckx, Marc Brysbaert UGent and Wim Fias UGent (2005) Journal of experimental psychology. Human perception and performance. 31(5). p.1150-1163
abstract
The authors investigated how 2-digit Arabic numerals are named by looking at the effects of masked primes on the naming latencies. Target numerals were named faster when prime and target shared a digit at the same position (e.g., the target 28 primed by 18 and 21). In contrast, naming latencies were slower when prime and target shared I or 2 digits at noncorresponding places (e.g., the target 28 primed by 82, 86, or 72). Subsequent experiments showed that these priming effects were situated at the level of the verbal production of the Arabic numerals. The data point to a nonsemantically mediated route from visual input to verbal output in the naming of 2-digit Arabic numerals.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
PARITY, DIGITS, DYSCALCULIA, TRANSLATION, REPRESENTATIONS, INTERFERENCE, COGNITIVE MECHANISMS, NUMBER WORDS, MEMORY, MODEL
journal title
Journal of experimental psychology. Human perception and performance
J. Exp. Psychol.-Hum. Percept. Perform.
volume
31
issue
5
pages
1150-1163 pages
publisher
AMER PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOC/EDUCATIONAL PUBLISHING FOUNDATION
place of publication
WASHINGTON, USA
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000233093600023
JCR category
PSYCHOLOGY, EXPERIMENTAL
JCR impact factor
2.883 (2005)
JCR rank
10/68 (2005)
JCR quartile
1 (2005)
ISSN
0096-1523
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
id
332908
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-332908
date created
2006-04-26 14:22:00
date last changed
2017-01-02 09:55:56
@article{332908,
  abstract     = {The authors investigated how 2-digit Arabic numerals are named by looking at the effects of masked primes on the naming latencies. Target numerals were named faster when prime and target shared a digit at the same position (e.g., the target 28 primed by 18 and 21). In contrast, naming latencies were slower when prime and target shared I or 2 digits at noncorresponding places (e.g., the target 28 primed by 82, 86, or 72). Subsequent experiments showed that these priming effects were situated at the level of the verbal production of the Arabic numerals. The data point to a nonsemantically mediated route from visual input to verbal output in the naming of 2-digit Arabic numerals.},
  author       = {Ratinckx, Elie and Brysbaert, Marc and Fias, Wim},
  issn         = {0096-1523},
  journal      = {Journal of experimental psychology. Human perception and performance},
  keyword      = {PARITY,DIGITS,DYSCALCULIA,TRANSLATION,REPRESENTATIONS,INTERFERENCE,COGNITIVE MECHANISMS,NUMBER WORDS,MEMORY,MODEL},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {1150--1163},
  publisher    = {AMER PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOC/EDUCATIONAL PUBLISHING FOUNDATION},
  title        = {Naming two-digit arabic numerals, evidence from masked priming studies},
  volume       = {31},
  year         = {2005},
}

Chicago
Ratinckx, Elie, Marc Brysbaert, and Wim Fias. 2005. “Naming Two-digit Arabic Numerals, Evidence from Masked Priming Studies.” Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance 31 (5): 1150–1163.
APA
Ratinckx, E., Brysbaert, M., & Fias, W. (2005). Naming two-digit arabic numerals, evidence from masked priming studies. Journal of experimental psychology. Human perception and performance, 31(5), 1150–1163.
Vancouver
1.
Ratinckx E, Brysbaert M, Fias W. Naming two-digit arabic numerals, evidence from masked priming studies. Journal of experimental psychology. Human perception and performance. WASHINGTON, USA: AMER PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOC/EDUCATIONAL PUBLISHING FOUNDATION; 2005;31(5):1150–63.
MLA
Ratinckx, Elie, Marc Brysbaert, and Wim Fias. “Naming Two-digit Arabic Numerals, Evidence from Masked Priming Studies.” Journal of experimental psychology. Human perception and performance 31.5 (2005): 1150–1163. Print.