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Lipopolysaccharides as a communication signal for progression of legume endosymbiosis

René Mathis UGent, Frédérique Van Gijsegem, Riet De Rycke UGent, Wim D'Haeze UGent, Els Van Maelsaeke, Erin Anthonio, Marc Van Montagu UGent, Marcella Holsters UGent and Danny Vereecke UGent (2005) PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. 102(7). p.2655-2660
abstract
Establishment of a successful symbiosis between rhizobia and legumes results from an elaborate molecular dialogue between both partners. Bacterial nodulation (Nod) factors are indispensable for initiating plant responses, whereas bacterial surface polysaccharides are important for infection progression and nodule development. The mutant ORS571-oac2 of Azorhizobium caulinodans, affected in its surface polysaccharides, provokes a defective interaction with its host Sesbania rostrata. ORS571-oac2 induced structures with retarded development and continued generation of infection centers and organ primordia, leading to multilobed ineffective nodules. Bacterial development throughout the interaction occurred without major defects. A functional bidirectional complementation was obtained upon coinfection of ORS571-oac2 and a Nod factor-deficient mutant, indicating that the Fix(-) phenotype of ORS571-oac2-induced nodules resulted from the absence of a positive signal from ORS571-oac2. indeed, the Fix- phenotype could be complemented by coinoculation of ORS571-oac2 with lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) purified from A. caulinodans. Our data show that Nod factors and LPSs are consecutive signals in symbiosis. Nod factors act first to trigger the onset of the nodulation and invasion program; LPSs inform the plant to proceed with the symbiotic interaction and to develop a functional fixation zone.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
INFECTION MUTANTS, NODULE DEVELOPMENT, ALFALFA NODULES, INTERCELLULAR INVASION, STRUCTURAL-CHARACTERIZATION, EXOPOLYSACCHARIDE PRODUCTION, RHIZOBIUM-MELILOTI, SESBANIA-ROSTRATA, AZORHIZOBIUM-CAULINODANS, polysaccharides, nodulation, plant-bacterium interaction, ROOT NODULATION
journal title
PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA
volume
102
issue
7
pages
2655 - 2660
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000227073100073
JCR category
MULTIDISCIPLINARY SCIENCES
JCR impact factor
10.231 (2005)
JCR rank
3/47 (2005)
JCR quartile
1 (2005)
ISSN
0027-8424
DOI
10.1073/pnas.0409816102
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
331190
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-331190
date created
2006-04-14 11:53:00
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:44:10
@article{331190,
  abstract     = {Establishment of a successful symbiosis between rhizobia and legumes results from an elaborate molecular dialogue between both partners. Bacterial nodulation (Nod) factors are indispensable for initiating plant responses, whereas bacterial surface polysaccharides are important for infection progression and nodule development. The mutant ORS571-oac2 of Azorhizobium caulinodans, affected in its surface polysaccharides, provokes a defective interaction with its host Sesbania rostrata. ORS571-oac2 induced structures with retarded development and continued generation of infection centers and organ primordia, leading to multilobed ineffective nodules. Bacterial development throughout the interaction occurred without major defects. A functional bidirectional complementation was obtained upon coinfection of ORS571-oac2 and a Nod factor-deficient mutant, indicating that the Fix(-) phenotype of ORS571-oac2-induced nodules resulted from the absence of a positive signal from ORS571-oac2. indeed, the Fix- phenotype could be complemented by coinoculation of ORS571-oac2 with lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) purified from A. caulinodans. Our data show that Nod factors and LPSs are consecutive signals in symbiosis. Nod factors act first to trigger the onset of the nodulation and invasion program; LPSs inform the plant to proceed with the symbiotic interaction and to develop a functional fixation zone.},
  author       = {Mathis, Ren{\'e} and Van Gijsegem, Fr{\'e}d{\'e}rique and De Rycke, Riet and D'Haeze, Wim and Van Maelsaeke, Els and Anthonio, Erin and Van Montagu, Marc and Holsters, Marcella and Vereecke, Danny},
  issn         = {0027-8424},
  journal      = {PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA},
  keyword      = {INFECTION MUTANTS,NODULE DEVELOPMENT,ALFALFA NODULES,INTERCELLULAR INVASION,STRUCTURAL-CHARACTERIZATION,EXOPOLYSACCHARIDE PRODUCTION,RHIZOBIUM-MELILOTI,SESBANIA-ROSTRATA,AZORHIZOBIUM-CAULINODANS,polysaccharides,nodulation,plant-bacterium interaction,ROOT NODULATION},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {2655--2660},
  title        = {Lipopolysaccharides as a communication signal for progression of legume endosymbiosis},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0409816102},
  volume       = {102},
  year         = {2005},
}

Chicago
Mathis, René, Frédérique Van Gijsegem, Riet De Rycke, Wim D’Haeze, Els Van Maelsaeke, Erin Anthonio, Marc Van Montagu, Marcella Holsters, and Danny Vereecke. 2005. “Lipopolysaccharides as a Communication Signal for Progression of Legume Endosymbiosis.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 102 (7): 2655–2660.
APA
Mathis, R., Van Gijsegem, F., De Rycke, R., D’Haeze, W., Van Maelsaeke, E., Anthonio, E., Van Montagu, M., et al. (2005). Lipopolysaccharides as a communication signal for progression of legume endosymbiosis. PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, 102(7), 2655–2660.
Vancouver
1.
Mathis R, Van Gijsegem F, De Rycke R, D’Haeze W, Van Maelsaeke E, Anthonio E, et al. Lipopolysaccharides as a communication signal for progression of legume endosymbiosis. PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. 2005;102(7):2655–60.
MLA
Mathis, René, Frédérique Van Gijsegem, Riet De Rycke, et al. “Lipopolysaccharides as a Communication Signal for Progression of Legume Endosymbiosis.” PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 102.7 (2005): 2655–2660. Print.