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How to speak for the Indian traditions : an agenda for the future

Balagangadhara Rao (2005) JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF RELIGION. 73(4). p.987-1013
abstract
The article attempts a contrast between the process and the structure of the Christian and the Indian spirituality. Drawing attention to their dissimilarities, it attempts to reformulate the differences among the Indian traditions in a novel way. It argues that cultures and traditions are not just different; rather that they differ from each other in different ways as well. The future of religious studies, it is suggested, is dependent on developing the ability to develop new ways of describing the differences between cultures and traditions. This is the agenda for the future. As a correlate to this task, the article suggests that we replace the question "who speaks 'for' and 'about' a religion?" with a more pregnant and a more accurate reformulation: "how to speak for a religion in the Academy?".
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
journal title
JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF RELIGION
J. Am. Acad. Relig.
volume
73
issue
4
pages
987 - 1013
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000234582700003
ISSN
0002-7189
DOI
10.1093/jaarel/lfi112
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
328911
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-328911
date created
2006-04-06 11:33:00
date last changed
2017-05-05 10:51:45
@article{328911,
  abstract     = {The article attempts a contrast between the process and the structure of the Christian and the Indian spirituality. Drawing attention to their dissimilarities, it attempts to reformulate the differences among the Indian traditions in a novel way. It argues that cultures and traditions are not just different; rather that they differ from each other in different ways as well. The future of religious studies, it is suggested, is dependent on developing the ability to develop new ways of describing the differences between cultures and traditions. This is the agenda for the future. As a correlate to this task, the article suggests that we replace the question {\textacutedbl}who speaks 'for' and 'about' a religion?{\textacutedbl} with a more pregnant and a more accurate reformulation: {\textacutedbl}how to speak for a religion in the Academy?{\textacutedbl}.},
  author       = {Rao, Balagangadhara},
  issn         = {0002-7189},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF RELIGION},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {987--1013},
  title        = {How to speak for the Indian traditions : an agenda for the future},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jaarel/lfi112},
  volume       = {73},
  year         = {2005},
}

Chicago
Rao, Balagangadhara. 2005. “How to Speak for the Indian Traditions : an Agenda for the Future.” Journal of the American Academy of Religion 73 (4): 987–1013.
APA
Rao, B. (2005). How to speak for the Indian traditions : an agenda for the future. JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF RELIGION, 73(4), 987–1013.
Vancouver
1.
Rao B. How to speak for the Indian traditions : an agenda for the future. JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF RELIGION. 2005;73(4):987–1013.
MLA
Rao, Balagangadhara. “How to Speak for the Indian Traditions : an Agenda for the Future.” JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF RELIGION 73.4 (2005): 987–1013. Print.