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Imaging volition: what the brain can tell us about the will

Marcel Brass UGent, Maggie Lynn, Jelle Demanet and Davide Rigoni UGent (2013) EXPERIMENTAL BRAIN RESEARCH. 229(3). p.301-312
abstract
The question of how we can voluntarily control our behaviour dates back to the beginnings of scientific psychology. Currently, there are two empirical research disciplines tackling human volition: cognitive neuroscience and social psychology. To date, there is little interaction between the two disciplines in terms of the investigation of human volition. The aim of the current article is to highlight recent brain imaging work on human volition and to relate social psychological concepts of volition to the functional neuroanatomy of intentional action. A host of studies indicate that the medial prefrontal cortex plays a crucial role in voluntary action. Accordingly, we postulate that social psychological concepts of volition can be investigated using neuroimaging techniques, and propose that by developing a social cognitive neuroscience of human volition, we may gain a deeper understanding of this fascinating and complex aspect of the human mind.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
TOURETTE-SYNDROME, ANTERIOR PREFRONTAL CORTEX, INTENTIONAL INHIBITION, VOLUNTARY MOVEMENT, Intentional control, fMRI, EVENT-RELATED FMRI, ROSTRAL CINGULATE ZONE, SELF-CONTROL, EGO DEPLETION, UNCONSCIOUS ACTIVATION, RESPONSE SELECTION, Volition, Medial prefrontal cortex
journal title
EXPERIMENTAL BRAIN RESEARCH
volume
229
issue
3
pages
301 - 312
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000323287000003
JCR category
NEUROSCIENCES
JCR impact factor
2.168 (2013)
JCR rank
171/252 (2013)
JCR quartile
3 (2013)
ISSN
0014-4819
DOI
10.1007/s00221-013-3472-x
project
The integrative neuroscience of behavioral control (Neuroscience)
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
3258156
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-3258156
date created
2013-06-14 11:29:42
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:44:59
@article{3258156,
  abstract     = {The question of how we can voluntarily control our behaviour dates back to the beginnings of scientific psychology. Currently, there are two empirical research disciplines tackling human volition: cognitive neuroscience and social psychology. To date, there is little interaction between the two disciplines in terms of the investigation of human volition. The aim of the current article is to highlight recent brain imaging work on human volition and to relate social psychological concepts of volition to the functional neuroanatomy of intentional action. A host of studies indicate that the medial prefrontal cortex plays a crucial role in voluntary action. Accordingly, we postulate that social psychological concepts of volition can be investigated using neuroimaging techniques, and propose that by developing a social cognitive neuroscience of human volition, we may gain a deeper understanding of this fascinating and complex aspect of the human mind.},
  author       = {Brass, Marcel and Lynn, Maggie and Demanet, Jelle and Rigoni, Davide},
  issn         = {0014-4819},
  journal      = {EXPERIMENTAL BRAIN RESEARCH},
  keyword      = {TOURETTE-SYNDROME,ANTERIOR PREFRONTAL CORTEX,INTENTIONAL INHIBITION,VOLUNTARY MOVEMENT,Intentional control,fMRI,EVENT-RELATED FMRI,ROSTRAL CINGULATE ZONE,SELF-CONTROL,EGO DEPLETION,UNCONSCIOUS ACTIVATION,RESPONSE SELECTION,Volition,Medial prefrontal cortex},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {301--312},
  title        = {Imaging volition: what the brain can tell us about the will},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-013-3472-x},
  volume       = {229},
  year         = {2013},
}

Chicago
Brass, Marcel, Maggie Lynn, Jelle Demanet, and Davide Rigoni. 2013. “Imaging Volition: What the Brain Can Tell Us About the Will.” Experimental Brain Research 229 (3): 301–312.
APA
Brass, M., Lynn, M., Demanet, J., & Rigoni, D. (2013). Imaging volition: what the brain can tell us about the will. EXPERIMENTAL BRAIN RESEARCH, 229(3), 301–312.
Vancouver
1.
Brass M, Lynn M, Demanet J, Rigoni D. Imaging volition: what the brain can tell us about the will. EXPERIMENTAL BRAIN RESEARCH. 2013;229(3):301–12.
MLA
Brass, Marcel, Maggie Lynn, Jelle Demanet, et al. “Imaging Volition: What the Brain Can Tell Us About the Will.” EXPERIMENTAL BRAIN RESEARCH 229.3 (2013): 301–312. Print.