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Leaving the third dimension: no measurable evidence for cognitive aftereffects of stereoscopic 3D movies

Klaas Bombeke (UGent) , Jan Van Looy (UGent) , Arnaud Szmalec and Wouter Duyck (UGent)
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Organization
Abstract
Stereoscopic 3D (S-3D) is becoming an increasingly important display technology. Parallel to this, concern about the potential negative effects of exposure to S-3D movies has been growing. Some manufacturers place disclaimers on their N=61) watched a full movie in either 2D or S-3D. Our results do not show evidence for cognitive aftereffects of S-3D movies. A second experiment (N=32) that focused on possible aftereffects on visual attention also failed to find reliable effects. We therefore conclude that cognitive functioning is not altered by watching an S-3D movie, at least not to an extent that is measurable through well-established cognitive tasks.
Keywords
TASK, SENSE, MEMORY, IMAGES, DESIGN, VISUAL FATIGUE, MENTAL ROTATION, stereoscopic 3D, aftereffects, spatial cognition, visual cognition, mental rotation, change detection, visually directed walking task

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Citation

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MLA
Bombeke, Klaas et al. “Leaving the Third Dimension: No Measurable Evidence for Cognitive Aftereffects of Stereoscopic 3D Movies.” JOURNAL OF THE SOCIETY FOR INFORMATION DISPLAY 21.4 (2013): 159–166. Print.
APA
Bombeke, K., Van Looy, J., Szmalec, A., & Duyck, W. (2013). Leaving the third dimension: no measurable evidence for cognitive aftereffects of stereoscopic 3D movies. JOURNAL OF THE SOCIETY FOR INFORMATION DISPLAY, 21(4), 159–166.
Chicago author-date
Bombeke, Klaas, Jan Van Looy, Arnaud Szmalec, and Wouter Duyck. 2013. “Leaving the Third Dimension: No Measurable Evidence for Cognitive Aftereffects of Stereoscopic 3D Movies.” Journal of the Society for Information Display 21 (4): 159–166.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Bombeke, Klaas, Jan Van Looy, Arnaud Szmalec, and Wouter Duyck. 2013. “Leaving the Third Dimension: No Measurable Evidence for Cognitive Aftereffects of Stereoscopic 3D Movies.” Journal of the Society for Information Display 21 (4): 159–166.
Vancouver
1.
Bombeke K, Van Looy J, Szmalec A, Duyck W. Leaving the third dimension: no measurable evidence for cognitive aftereffects of stereoscopic 3D movies. JOURNAL OF THE SOCIETY FOR INFORMATION DISPLAY. 2013;21(4):159–66.
IEEE
[1]
K. Bombeke, J. Van Looy, A. Szmalec, and W. Duyck, “Leaving the third dimension: no measurable evidence for cognitive aftereffects of stereoscopic 3D movies,” JOURNAL OF THE SOCIETY FOR INFORMATION DISPLAY, vol. 21, no. 4, pp. 159–166, 2013.
@article{3232835,
  abstract     = {Stereoscopic 3D (S-3D) is becoming an increasingly important display technology. Parallel to this, concern about the potential negative effects of exposure to S-3D movies has been growing. Some manufacturers place disclaimers on their N=61) watched a full movie in either 2D or S-3D. Our results do not show evidence for cognitive aftereffects of S-3D movies. A second experiment (N=32) that focused on possible aftereffects on visual attention also failed to find reliable effects. We therefore conclude that cognitive functioning is not altered by watching an S-3D movie, at least not to an extent that is measurable through well-established cognitive tasks.},
  author       = {Bombeke, Klaas and Van Looy, Jan and Szmalec, Arnaud and Duyck, Wouter},
  issn         = {1071-0922},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF THE SOCIETY FOR INFORMATION DISPLAY},
  keywords     = {TASK,SENSE,MEMORY,IMAGES,DESIGN,VISUAL FATIGUE,MENTAL ROTATION,stereoscopic 3D,aftereffects,spatial cognition,visual cognition,mental rotation,change detection,visually directed walking task},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {159--166},
  title        = {Leaving the third dimension: no measurable evidence for cognitive aftereffects of stereoscopic 3D movies},
  volume       = {21},
  year         = {2013},
}

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