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Female domestic servants as desirable refugees: gender, labour needs and immigration policy in Belgium, the Netherlands and Great Britain

(2011) EUROPEAN HISTORY QUARTERLY. 41(2). p.213-230
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Abstract
The immigration policies adopted by Western European states during the interwar period were marked by increasing restriction, especially after 1933. One notable exception to this was the relatively generous treatment afforded to women who were prepared to take up employment as domestic servants. This article looks at the reasons behind this anomaly and compares the responses of three states that were in the front line of the refugee efflux from Germany and Eastern Europe in the years leading up to the Second World War.
Keywords
immigration, refugees, Western Europe

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Citation

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Chicago
Caestecker, Frank, and Bob Moore. 2011. “Female Domestic Servants as Desirable Refugees: Gender, Labour Needs and Immigration Policy in Belgium, the Netherlands and Great Britain.” European History Quarterly 41 (2): 213–230.
APA
Caestecker, F., & Moore, B. (2011). Female domestic servants as desirable refugees: gender, labour needs and immigration policy in Belgium, the Netherlands and Great Britain. EUROPEAN HISTORY QUARTERLY, 41(2), 213–230.
Vancouver
1.
Caestecker F, Moore B. Female domestic servants as desirable refugees: gender, labour needs and immigration policy in Belgium, the Netherlands and Great Britain. EUROPEAN HISTORY QUARTERLY. 2011;41(2):213–30.
MLA
Caestecker, Frank, and Bob Moore. “Female Domestic Servants as Desirable Refugees: Gender, Labour Needs and Immigration Policy in Belgium, the Netherlands and Great Britain.” EUROPEAN HISTORY QUARTERLY 41.2 (2011): 213–230. Print.
@article{3232089,
  abstract     = {The immigration policies adopted by Western European states during the interwar period were marked by increasing restriction, especially after 1933. One notable exception to this was the relatively generous treatment afforded to women who were prepared to take up employment as domestic servants. This article looks at the reasons behind this anomaly and compares the responses of three states that were in the front line of the refugee efflux from Germany and Eastern Europe in the years leading up to the Second World War.},
  author       = {Caestecker, Frank and Moore, Bob},
  issn         = {0265-6914},
  journal      = {EUROPEAN HISTORY QUARTERLY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {213--230},
  title        = {Female domestic servants as desirable refugees: gender, labour needs and immigration policy in Belgium, the Netherlands and Great Britain},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0265691411399699},
  volume       = {41},
  year         = {2011},
}

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