Advanced search
1 file | 152.43 KB

Chlamydial infections in Chinese livestock

Lizi Yin (UGent) , Isabelle Kalmar, Jeanne Boden (UGent) and Daisy Vanrompay (UGent)
Author
Organization
Abstract
The occurrence and impact of chlamydial infections in Western livestock is well documented in the international literature, but less is known about these infections in livestock in the People's Republic of China. China's livestock production and its share in the global market have increased significantly in recent decades. In this review, the relevant English and Chinese literature on the epidemiology of chlamydial infections in Chinese livestock is considered, and biosecurity measures, prophylaxis and treatment of these infections in China's livestock are compared with Western practices. Chlamydial infections are highly prevalent in Chinese livestock and cause important economic losses, as they do in the rest of the world. Surveillance data and diagnostic results of abortion outbreaks in cattle, sheep and goats highlight the importance of virulent chlamydial infections in China's major ruminant species in many of China's provinces, autonomous regions and municipalities. Data from many of China's provincial divisions also indicate the widespread presence of chlamydial infections in industrially reared swine across the country. Less is known about chlamydial infections in yak, buffalo and horses, but available reports indicate a high prevalence in China's populations. In these reports, chlamydiosis was related to abortions in yak and pneumonia in horses. In Western countries, chlamydial infections are principally treated with antibiotics. In China, however, traditional medicine is often used in conjunction with antibiotics or used as an alternative treatment.
Keywords
EWES, SOWS, GOATS, FARMS, TAIWAN, PREVALENCE, SEROPREVALENCE, PSITTACI INFECTION, CHLAMYDOPHILA-ABORTUS INFECTION, Traditional medicine, Livestock, Chlamydiaceae, China, Biosecurity, Antibiotic treatment

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 152.43 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Yin, Lizi, Isabelle Kalmar, Jeanne Boden, and Daisy Vanrompay. 2013. “Chlamydial Infections in Chinese Livestock.” Revue Scientifique Et Technique-office International Des Epizooties 32 (3): 817–831.
APA
Yin, L., Kalmar, I., Boden, J., & Vanrompay, D. (2013). Chlamydial infections in Chinese livestock. REVUE SCIENTIFIQUE ET TECHNIQUE-OFFICE INTERNATIONAL DES EPIZOOTIES, 32(3), 817–831.
Vancouver
1.
Yin L, Kalmar I, Boden J, Vanrompay D. Chlamydial infections in Chinese livestock. REVUE SCIENTIFIQUE ET TECHNIQUE-OFFICE INTERNATIONAL DES EPIZOOTIES. 2013;32(3):817–31.
MLA
Yin, Lizi, Isabelle Kalmar, Jeanne Boden, et al. “Chlamydial Infections in Chinese Livestock.” REVUE SCIENTIFIQUE ET TECHNIQUE-OFFICE INTERNATIONAL DES EPIZOOTIES 32.3 (2013): 817–831. Print.
@article{3230883,
  abstract     = {The occurrence and impact of chlamydial infections in Western livestock is well documented in the international literature, but less is known about these infections in livestock in the People's Republic of China. China's livestock production and its share in the global market have increased significantly in recent decades. In this review, the relevant English and Chinese literature on the epidemiology of chlamydial infections in Chinese livestock is considered, and biosecurity measures, prophylaxis and treatment of these infections in China's livestock are compared with Western practices. Chlamydial infections are highly prevalent in Chinese livestock and cause important economic losses, as they do in the rest of the world. Surveillance data and diagnostic results of abortion outbreaks in cattle, sheep and goats highlight the importance of virulent chlamydial infections in China's major ruminant species in many of China's provinces, autonomous regions and municipalities. Data from many of China's provincial divisions also indicate the widespread presence of chlamydial infections in industrially reared swine across the country. Less is known about chlamydial infections in yak, buffalo and horses, but available reports indicate a high prevalence in China's populations. In these reports, chlamydiosis was related to abortions in yak and pneumonia in horses. In Western countries, chlamydial infections are principally treated with antibiotics. In China, however, traditional medicine is often used in conjunction with antibiotics or used as an alternative treatment.},
  author       = {Yin, Lizi and Kalmar, Isabelle and Boden, Jeanne and Vanrompay, Daisy},
  issn         = {0253-1933},
  journal      = {REVUE SCIENTIFIQUE ET TECHNIQUE-OFFICE INTERNATIONAL DES EPIZOOTIES},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {817--831},
  title        = {Chlamydial infections in Chinese livestock},
  url          = {http://www.oie.int/fileadmin/Home/eng/Publications\_\%26\_Documentation/docs/pdf/revue\_plurithematique/2013/No22102013-00011-EN-Yin-Kalmar.pdf},
  volume       = {32},
  year         = {2013},
}

Web of Science
Times cited: