Advanced search
1 file | 1.19 MB

Beyond child soldiering: the interference of daily living conditions in former child soldiers' longer term psychosocial well-being in northern Uganda

(2013) GLOBAL PUBLIC HEALTH. 8(5). p.485-503
Author
Organization
Abstract
Given the various developments in former child soldiers' psychosocial well-being over time, the question arises as to which factors are associated with the prevalence of psychological distress. An ongoing debate points to the plausible importance of child soldiering-related and post-child soldiering factors. This study is an exploratory analysis of both types of association with former child soldiers' psychosocial well-being in the longer term. Follow-up data on a convenience sample of 424 northern Ugandan former child soldiers are analysed. Psychological symptoms are assessed by a review of the intake and assessment forms of the Rachele Rehabilitation Centre, which were not validated and did not include a standardised translation into the local language. These psychological symptoms and possible associated factors are analysed using binary logistic regression analysis. Thereby, both child soldiering-related and post-child soldiering variables are accounted for. The outcomes reveal almost no significant main effects of child soldiering-related variables, while a range of post-child soldiering variables (number of meals a day, school attendance, insults and professional support) are clearly associated with the prevalence of the measured psychological symptoms in the longer term. These exploratory conclusions should be further investigated in representative samples of former child soldiers using validated assessment tools.
Keywords
war exposure, post-child soldiering conditions, psychosocial well-being, northern Uganda, child soldiers, CONSEQUENCES, REINTEGRATION, IMPACT, TRAUMA, DISORDER, WAR, MASS VIOLENCE, POSTTRAUMATIC-STRESS, MENTAL-HEALTH, ARMED CONFLICT

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 1.19 MB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Vindevogel, Sofie, Kathleen Coppens, Maarten De Schryver, Gerrit Loots, Eric Broekaert, and Ilse Derluyn. 2013. “Beyond Child Soldiering: The Interference of Daily Living Conditions in Former Child Soldiers’ Longer Term Psychosocial Well-being in Northern Uganda.” Global Public Health 8 (5): 485–503.
APA
Vindevogel, S., Coppens, K., De Schryver, M., Loots, G., Broekaert, E., & Derluyn, I. (2013). Beyond child soldiering: the interference of daily living conditions in former child soldiers’ longer term psychosocial well-being in northern Uganda. GLOBAL PUBLIC HEALTH, 8(5), 485–503.
Vancouver
1.
Vindevogel S, Coppens K, De Schryver M, Loots G, Broekaert E, Derluyn I. Beyond child soldiering: the interference of daily living conditions in former child soldiers’ longer term psychosocial well-being in northern Uganda. GLOBAL PUBLIC HEALTH. 2013;8(5):485–503.
MLA
Vindevogel, Sofie, Kathleen Coppens, Maarten De Schryver, et al. “Beyond Child Soldiering: The Interference of Daily Living Conditions in Former Child Soldiers’ Longer Term Psychosocial Well-being in Northern Uganda.” GLOBAL PUBLIC HEALTH 8.5 (2013): 485–503. Print.
@article{3218354,
  abstract     = {Given the various developments in former child soldiers' psychosocial well-being over time, the question arises as to which factors are associated with the prevalence of psychological distress. An ongoing debate points to the plausible importance of child soldiering-related and post-child soldiering factors. This study is an exploratory analysis of both types of association with former child soldiers' psychosocial well-being in the longer term. Follow-up data on a convenience sample of 424 northern Ugandan former child soldiers are analysed. Psychological symptoms are assessed by a review of the intake and assessment forms of the Rachele Rehabilitation Centre, which were not validated and did not include a standardised translation into the local language. These psychological symptoms and possible associated factors are analysed using binary logistic regression analysis. Thereby, both child soldiering-related and post-child soldiering variables are accounted for. The outcomes reveal almost no significant main effects of child soldiering-related variables, while a range of post-child soldiering variables (number of meals a day, school attendance, insults and professional support) are clearly associated with the prevalence of the measured psychological symptoms in the longer term. These exploratory conclusions should be further investigated in representative samples of former child soldiers using validated assessment tools.},
  author       = {Vindevogel, Sofie and Coppens, Kathleen and De Schryver, Maarten and Loots, Gerrit and Broekaert, Eric and Derluyn, Ilse},
  issn         = {1744-1692},
  journal      = {GLOBAL PUBLIC HEALTH},
  keywords     = {war exposure,post-child soldiering conditions,psychosocial well-being,northern Uganda,child soldiers,CONSEQUENCES,REINTEGRATION,IMPACT,TRAUMA,DISORDER,WAR,MASS VIOLENCE,POSTTRAUMATIC-STRESS,MENTAL-HEALTH,ARMED CONFLICT},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {485--503},
  title        = {Beyond child soldiering: the interference of daily living conditions in former child soldiers' longer term psychosocial well-being in northern Uganda},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17441692.2013.790460},
  volume       = {8},
  year         = {2013},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: