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Plasma surface modification of polylactic acid to promote interaction with fibroblasts

Tinneke Jacobs, Heidi Declercq UGent, Nathalie De Geyter UGent, Maria Cornelissen UGent, Peter Dubruel UGent, Christophe Leys UGent, Arnaud Beaurain, Edmond Payen and Rino Morent UGent (2013) JOURNAL OF MATERIALS SCIENCE-MATERIALS IN MEDICINE. 24(2). p.469-478
abstract
In this work, medium pressure plasma treatment of polylactic acid (PLA) is investigated. PLA is a biocompatible aliphatic polymer, which can be used for bone fixation devices and tissue engineering scaffolds. Due to inadequate surface properties, cell adhesion and proliferation are far less than optimal and a surface modification is required for most biomedical applications. By using a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) operating at medium pressure in different atmospheres, the surface properties of a PLA foil are modified. After plasma treatment, water contact angle measurements showed an increased hydrophilic character of the foil surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed an increased oxygen content. Cell culture tests showed that plasma modification of PLA films increased the initial cell attachment both quantitatively and qualitatively. After 1 day, cells on plasma-treated PLA showed a superior cell morphology in comparison with unmodified PLA samples. However, after 7 days of culture, no significant differences were observed between untreated and plasma-modified PLA samples. While plasma treatment improves the initial cell attachment, it does not seem to influence cell proliferation. It has also been observed that the difference between the 3 discharge gases is negligible when looking at the improved cell-material interactions. From economical point of view, plasma treatments in air are thus the best choice.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
POLYMER-FILMS, DBD TREATMENT, CELL AFFINITY, GLOW-DISCHARGE, POLY(L-LACTIC ACID), OPERATING PARAMETERS, ATMOSPHERIC-PRESSURE, MEDIUM PRESSURE, DIELECTRIC BARRIER DISCHARGE, L-LACTIC ACID
journal title
JOURNAL OF MATERIALS SCIENCE-MATERIALS IN MEDICINE
J. Mater. Sci.-Mater. Med.
volume
24
issue
2
pages
469 - 478
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000314775100018
JCR category
ENGINEERING, BIOMEDICAL
JCR impact factor
2.379 (2013)
JCR rank
26/76 (2013)
JCR quartile
2 (2013)
ISSN
0957-4530
DOI
10.1007/s10856-012-4807-z
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
3206422
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-3206422
date created
2013-05-03 09:22:52
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:44:50
@article{3206422,
  abstract     = {In this work, medium pressure plasma treatment of polylactic acid (PLA) is investigated. PLA is a biocompatible aliphatic polymer, which can be used for bone fixation devices and tissue engineering scaffolds. Due to inadequate surface properties, cell adhesion and proliferation are far less than optimal and a surface modification is required for most biomedical applications. By using a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) operating at medium pressure in different atmospheres, the surface properties of a PLA foil are modified. After plasma treatment, water contact angle measurements showed an increased hydrophilic character of the foil surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed an increased oxygen content. Cell culture tests showed that plasma modification of PLA films increased the initial cell attachment both quantitatively and qualitatively. After 1 day, cells on plasma-treated PLA showed a superior cell morphology in comparison with unmodified PLA samples. However, after 7 days of culture, no significant differences were observed between untreated and plasma-modified PLA samples. While plasma treatment improves the initial cell attachment, it does not seem to influence cell proliferation. It has also been observed that the difference between the 3 discharge gases is negligible when looking at the improved cell-material interactions. From economical point of view, plasma treatments in air are thus the best choice.},
  author       = {Jacobs, Tinneke and Declercq, Heidi and De Geyter, Nathalie and Cornelissen, Maria and Dubruel, Peter and Leys, Christophe and Beaurain, Arnaud and Payen, Edmond and Morent, Rino},
  issn         = {0957-4530},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF MATERIALS SCIENCE-MATERIALS IN MEDICINE},
  keyword      = {POLYMER-FILMS,DBD TREATMENT,CELL AFFINITY,GLOW-DISCHARGE,POLY(L-LACTIC ACID),OPERATING PARAMETERS,ATMOSPHERIC-PRESSURE,MEDIUM PRESSURE,DIELECTRIC BARRIER DISCHARGE,L-LACTIC ACID},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {469--478},
  title        = {Plasma surface modification of polylactic acid to promote interaction with fibroblasts},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10856-012-4807-z},
  volume       = {24},
  year         = {2013},
}

Chicago
Jacobs, Tinneke, Heidi Declercq, Nathalie De Geyter, Maria Cornelissen, Peter Dubruel, Christophe Leys, Arnaud Beaurain, Edmond Payen, and Rino Morent. 2013. “Plasma Surface Modification of Polylactic Acid to Promote Interaction with Fibroblasts.” Journal of Materials Science-materials in Medicine 24 (2): 469–478.
APA
Jacobs, Tinneke, Declercq, H., De Geyter, N., Cornelissen, M., Dubruel, P., Leys, C., Beaurain, A., et al. (2013). Plasma surface modification of polylactic acid to promote interaction with fibroblasts. JOURNAL OF MATERIALS SCIENCE-MATERIALS IN MEDICINE, 24(2), 469–478.
Vancouver
1.
Jacobs T, Declercq H, De Geyter N, Cornelissen M, Dubruel P, Leys C, et al. Plasma surface modification of polylactic acid to promote interaction with fibroblasts. JOURNAL OF MATERIALS SCIENCE-MATERIALS IN MEDICINE. 2013;24(2):469–78.
MLA
Jacobs, Tinneke, Heidi Declercq, Nathalie De Geyter, et al. “Plasma Surface Modification of Polylactic Acid to Promote Interaction with Fibroblasts.” JOURNAL OF MATERIALS SCIENCE-MATERIALS IN MEDICINE 24.2 (2013): 469–478. Print.